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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Salinas, California » Crop Improvement and Protection Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #335155

Research Project: Biology, Epidemiology and Management of Vector-Borne Viruses of Sugarbeet and Vegetable Crops

Location: Crop Improvement and Protection Research

Title: Advantages of using ‘omics’ technologies and bioinformatics for analyzing the impact of pathogens on sugarbeet

Author
item Wintermantel, William - Bill
item Webb, Kimberly
item RUPP, JESSICA - Montana State University

Submitted to: American Society of Sugar Beet Technologists
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 10/17/2016
Publication Date: 2/27/2017
Citation: Wintermantel, W.M., Webb, K.M., Rupp, J.L. 2017. Advantages of using ‘omics’ technologies and bioinformatics for analyzing the impact of pathogens on sugarbeet. American Society of Sugar Beet Technologists. February 27-March 2, 2017, Greenville, South Carolina.

Interpretive Summary: Throughout the history of American sugarbeet production, research has proceeded hand-in-hand with the emergence of new diseases, and sugarbeet scientists have used the technologies available to improve disease management and crop yield in the face of the emerging disease pressures. Many traditional methods will always remain important for disease management, including pathogen-host range studies, pathogen isolation and inoculation of sugarbeet to confirm causative nature of the pathogen, and identification of environmental factors that contribute to disease. In the late 20th Century the advent of molecular biology revolutionized plant pathology, leading to DNA and RNA based detection methods, and the ability to rapidly identify pathogen variants due to unique characteristics of their DNA. The development of methods for analysis of the complete sequence of the genome (total DNA), transcriptome (RNA produced from DNA), proteome (all expressed proteins), and metabolome (total biochemical compounds produced) now allow scientists the ability to essentially begin putting together a systemic analysis of how sugarbeet responds to pathogen infection or to other factors. While the technology is complex, the end result can be used to decipher how sugarbeet responds to pathogen attack. Studies by our laboratories have addressed changes in sugarbeet using proteome and metabolome analysis to understand the effects of Rhizomania and Rhizoctonia crown and root rot on sugarbeet. Others have used transcriptome and genomic analysis. Each of these methods is connected to the others and all utilize information encoded by the genome. The real advantage of such methods is that they can be used to obtain both knowledge of gene expression by healthy sugarbeet as well as when sugarbeet is impacted by a pathogen or influenced by external environmental factors at the molecular level. This information can be generated within a relatively short period of time, and can facilitate targeted strategies, leading to improved control. By integrating omics technologies into traditional sugarbeet pathology, we can advance our ability to protect sugarbeet from disease and environmental stresses.

Technical Abstract: Throughout the history of American sugarbeet production, research has proceeded hand-in-hand with the emergence of new diseases, and sugarbeet scientists have used the technologies available to improve disease management and crop yield in the face of the emerging disease pressures. Many traditional methods will always remain important for disease management, including pathogen-host range studies, pathogen isolation and inoculation of sugarbeet to confirm causative nature of the pathogen, and identification of environmental factors that contribute to disease. In the late 20th Century the advent of molecular biology revolutionized plant pathology, leading to DNA and RNA based detection methods, and the ability to rapidly identify pathogen variants due to unique characteristics of their DNA. The development of methods for analysis of the complete sequence of the genome (total DNA), transcriptome (RNA produced from DNA), proteome (all expressed proteins), and metabolome (total biochemical compounds produced) now allow scientists the ability to essentially begin putting together a systemic analysis of how sugarbeet responds to pathogen infection or to other factors. While the technology is complex, the end result can be used to decipher how sugarbeet responds to pathogen attack. Studies by our laboratories have addressed changes in sugarbeet using proteome and metabolome analysis to understand the effects of Rhizomania and Rhizoctonia crown and root rot on sugarbeet. Others have used transcriptome and genomic analysis. Each of these methods is connected to the others and all utilize information encoded by the genome. The real advantage of such methods is that they can be used to obtain both knowledge of gene expression by healthy sugarbeet as well as when sugarbeet is impacted by a pathogen or influenced by external environmental factors at the molecular level. This information can be generated within a relatively short period of time, and can facilitate targeted strategies, leading to improved control. By integrating omics technologies into traditional sugarbeet pathology, we can advance our ability to protect sugarbeet from disease and environmental stresses.