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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Stoneville, Mississippi » Warmwater Aquaculture Research Unit » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #334899

Research Project: Water Quality and Production Systems to Enhance Production of Catfish

Location: Warmwater Aquaculture Research Unit

Title: Water quality

Author
item Boyd, Claude - Auburn University
item Tucker, Craig

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: 12/5/2016
Publication Date: N/A
Citation: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Aquatic animals are healthiest and grow best when environmental conditions are within certain ranges that define, for a particular species, “good” water quality. From the outset, successful aquaculture requires a high-quality water supply. Water quality in aquaculture systems also deteriorates as an unintended consequence of feeding animals to enhance production. Water must be managed during production to assure good growth and to avoid stress and death of the cultured species. Furthermore, water discharged from aquaculture facilities contains nutrients, organic matter and suspended solids that can pollute receiving water bodies. Many aquaculture facilities must treat water to minimize pollution and comply with effluent discharge regulations. This chapter in the textbook “Aquaculture: Farming Aquatic Animals and Plants, third edition” summarizes the important aspects water quality in aquaculture, including definitions and discussion of major water quality variables, effects of water quality on aquatic animals growth and physiology, how to manage water quality in aquaculture systems to improve animal performance, and the nature and management of effluents from aquaculture systems.

Technical Abstract: Aquatic animals are healthiest and grow best when environmental conditions are within certain ranges that define, for a particular species, “good” water quality. From the outset, successful aquaculture requires a high-quality water supply. Water quality in aquaculture systems also deteriorates as an unintended consequence of feeding animals to enhance production. Water must be managed during production to assure good growth and to avoid stress and death of the cultured species. Furthermore, water discharged from aquaculture facilities contains nutrients, organic matter and suspended solids that can pollute receiving water bodies. Many aquaculture facilities must treat water to minimize pollution and comply with effluent discharge regulations. This chapter in the textbook “Aquaculture: Farming Aquatic Animals and Plants, third edition” summarizes the important aspects water quality in aquaculture, including definitions and discussion of major water quality variables, effects of water quality on aquatic animals growth and physiology, how to manage water quality in aquaculture systems to improve animal performance, and the nature and management of effluents from aquaculture systems.