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ARS Home » Midwest Area » Columbia, Missouri » Plant Genetics Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #334091

Research Project: Genetics and Genomics of Complex Traits in Grain Crops

Location: Plant Genetics Research

Title: Rootworm management: status of GM traits, insecticides, and potential new tools

Author
item Ludwick, Dalton - University Of Missouri
item Hibbard, Bruce

Submitted to: CAB Reviews: Perspectives in Agriculture, Veterinary Science, Nutrition and Natural Resources
Publication Type: Literature Review
Publication Acceptance Date: 11/22/2016
Publication Date: 2/22/2017
Citation: Ludwick, D.C., Hibbard, B.E. 2017. Rootworm management: status of GM traits, insecticides, and potential new tools. CAB Reviews: Perspectives in Agriculture, Veterinary Science, Nutrition and Natural Resources. 11(2016). Available: http://www.cabi.org/cabreviews/abstract/20173027030.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte) and northern corn rootworm (Diabrotica barberi (Smith and Lawrence) are major pests of maize in the United States of America (USA). These pests have been managed with a variety of tactics over the last century. Diabrotica spp. have adapted to crop rotation in different ways in certain regions of the USA. D. v. virgifera has adapted to some chemical control and transgenic control methods. Discussed in this review are the challenges associated with controlling both species, and how current management strategies might be combined and implemented to control these species. Also, we discuss the potential for new technologies, such as RNA interference, to be used in the future. REVIEW METHODOLOGY Literature was selected based on its relevance to adaptations with western and northern corn rootworms (Diabrotica spp.). Recent reviews on ecology, behavior, population dynamics, genetics, and Bt maize resistance have been written. We have directed our focus towards updating readers on new findings in areas as they relate to Bt maize and Diabrotica spp., but have done this from a historical perspective including the history of these pests, in general. We hypothesize why refuges did not delay resistance to Bt maize targeting rootworm. Lastly, we have incorporated potential new techniques which may be used to help manage Diabrotica spp. or combat Bt resistance.