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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Logan, Utah » Poisonous Plant Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #332060

Research Project: Understanding and Mitigating the Adverse Effects of Poisonous Plants on Livestock Production Systems

Location: Poisonous Plant Research

Title: Spontaneous and experimental poisoning of cattle by Palicourea aeneofusca in the region of Pernambuco and introduction of conditioned food aversion

Author
item BRITO, LUIZ - Federal Rural University Of Pernambuco
item ALBUQUERQUE, RAQUEL - Federal Rural University Of Pernambuco
item ROCHA, BRENA - Federal Rural University Of Pernambuco
item ALBUQUERQUE, SAMUEL - Federal Rural University Of Pernambuco
item Lee, Stephen
item MEDEIROS, ROSANE - Veterinary Hospital, Federal University Of Campina Grande (UFCG)
item RIET-CORREA, FRANKLIN - Veterinary Hospital, Federal University Of Campina Grande (UFCG)
item MENDONCA, FABIO - Federal Rural University Of Pernambuco

Submitted to: Electronic Publication
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 5/29/2015
Publication Date: 1/1/2016
Publication URL: https://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/5394135
Citation: Brito, L.B., Albuquerque, R.F., Rocha, B.P., Albuquerque, S.S., Lee, S.T., Medeiros, R.M., Riet-Correa, F., Mendonca, F.D. 2016. Spontaneous and experimental poisoning of cattle by Palicourea aeneofusca in the region of Pernambuco and introduction of conditioned food aversion. Ciencia Rural. 46(1):138-143.

Interpretive Summary: The objective of this study was to describe Palicourea aeneofusca poisoning in cattle in the region of Pernambuco, Brazil and to determine if it is possible to induce food aversion by P. aeneofusca poisoning in cattle raised under extensive management conditions. To determine the occurrence of poisoning, 30 properties were visited in five municipalities of the region of Pernambuco. Three outbreaks of poisoning of cattle were monitored. To induce conditioned food aversion by the consumption of P. aeneofusca, 12 animals were randomly distributed into two groups of six animals each. Cattle were weighed and received green P. aeneofusca leaves in their trough at a dose of 35 mg/kg body weight for spontaneous consumption. The control group animals received water (1ml/kg body weight) via a feeding tube after the first ingestion of the plant, while the other animals, constituting the aversion test group, underwent induced aversion with lithium chloride (LiCl 175 mg kg/ body weight) via a feeding tube. For the aversion test group cattle, the aversion to P. aeneofusca induced by a single dose of LiCl persisted for 12 months. In contrast, the control group animals continued to consume the plant in all tests performed, indicating the absence of aversion. This study showed that aversive conditioning using LiCl was effective in preventing poisoning by P. aeneofusca for a period of at least 12 months.

Technical Abstract: The objective of this study was to describe the epidemiological, clinical, and pathological aspects of Palicourea aeneofusca poisoning in cattle in the region of Pernambuco, Brazil and to determine if it is possible to induce food aversion by P. aeneofusca poisoning in cattle raised under extensive management conditions. To determine the occurrence of poisoning, 30 properties were visited in five municipalities of the region of Pernambuco. Three outbreaks of poisoning of cattle were monitored. To induce conditioned food aversion by the consumption of P. aeneofusca, 12 animals were randomly distributed into two groups of six animals each. Cattle were weighed and received green P. aeneofusca leaves in their trough at a dose of 35mg kg-1 body weight for spontaneous consumption. The control group (CG) animals received water (1mlkg-1 body weight) via a feeding tube after the first ingestion of the plant, while the other animals, constituting the aversion test group (ATG), underwent induced aversion with lithium chloride (LiCl - 175mg kg-1 body weight) via a feeding tube. For the ATG cattle, the aversion to P. aeneofusca induced by a single dose of LiCl persisted for 12 months. In contrast, the CG animals continued to consume the plant in all tests performed, indicating the absence of aversion. This study showed that aversive conditioning using LiCl was effective in preventing poisoning by P. aeneofusca for a period of at least 12 months.