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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Davis, California » Western Human Nutrition Research Center » Obesity and Metabolism Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #331955

Research Project: Novel Functions and Biomarkers for Vitamins and Minerals

Location: Obesity and Metabolism Research

Title: Micronutrient supplements during pregnancy and/or lactation in Malawi and Ghana increase breast milk B-vitamins [abstract]

Author
item Shahab-ferdows, Setti
item Hampel, Daniela - University Of California
item Dewey, Kathryn - University Of California
item Ashorn, Per - University Of Tampere Medical School
item Bentley, Margaret - University Of North Carolina
item Adair, Linda - University Of North Carolina
item Flax, Valerie - University Of North Carolina
item Allen, Lindsay

Submitted to: Micronutrient Forum Global Conference
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 9/2/2014
Publication Date: 9/4/2014
Citation: Shahab-Ferdows, S., Hampel, D., Dewey, K., Ashorn, P., Bentley, M., Adair, L., Flax, V., Allen, L.H. 2014. Micronutrient supplements during pregnancy and/or lactation in Malawi and Ghana increase breast milk B-vitamins [abstract]. Micronutrient Forum Global Conference. doi:10.4172:2161-0509.1000142.

Interpretive Summary: There are few data available on the effect of micronutrient (MN) supplementation interventions during pregnancy/lactation on breast milk (BM) MN concentrations. Exclusive breast feeding is recommended fort 6mo and BM-MN concentrations are important determinants of infant MN status, growth and development. The objective was to assess BM B-vitamin concentrations in two randomized controlled supplementation trials; i) in Malawi in pregnancy/lactation (iLiNS) and ii) in lactation (BAN). In the iLiNS project, pregnant women recruited at <20 wk gestation received either: 1 daily capsule of iron/folic-acid (IFA) during pregnancy and placebo during lactation, or a multiple micronutrient (MMN) or lipid-based nutrient supplement (LNS) during pregnancy and 6 mo of lactation. In the BAN project, HIV+ breast feeding women were randomized into either LNS supplemented or control groups during lactation. In both studies BM samples were collected at 6mo postpartum and BM B-vitamin (B1, B2, B6 and B12) concentrations were determined. In iLiNS BM B12 concentrations were sig. higher in the LNS (367pmol/L) vs. IFA (297pmol/L) group but not different from MN (357pmol/L); B1was sig. higher in MN (205ug/L) vs. IFA (187ug/L) and LNS (192ug/L); B2 was sig. higher in MN (65ug/L) and LNS (72ug/L) vs. IFA (54ug/L). In BAN all the B-vitamin concentrations were sig. increased in the breast milk of the LNS vs. the control group except for B1. Maternal MN in pregnancy and LNS in pregnancy and lactation increase BM B2 and B12; LNS in lactation alone increases BM B2, B6 and B12. However, B1 in BM is increased only by supplementation in pregnancy.

Technical Abstract: There are few data available on the effect of micronutrient (MN) supplementation interventions during pregnancy/lactation on breast milk (BM) MN concentrations. Exclusive breast feeding is recommended fort 6mo and BM-MN concentrations are important determinants of infant MN status, growth and development. The objective was to assess BM B-vitamin concentrations in two randomized controlled supplementation trials; i) in Malawi in pregnancy/lactation (iLiNS) and ii) in lactation (BAN). In the iLiNS project, pregnant women recruited at <20 wk gestation received either: 1 daily capsule of iron/folic-acid (IFA) during pregnancy and placebo during lactation, or a multiple micronutrient (MMN) or lipid-based nutrient supplement (LNS) during pregnancy and 6 mo of lactation. In the BAN project, HIV+ breast feeding women were randomized into either LNS supplemented or control groups during lactation. In both studies BM samples were collected at 6mo postpartum and BM B-vitamin (B1, B2, B6 and B12) concentrations were determined. In iLiNS BM B12 concentrations were sig. higher in the LNS (367pmol/L) vs. IFA (297pmol/L) group but not different from MN (357pmol/L); B1was sig. higher in MN (205ug/L) vs. IFA (187ug/L) and LNS (192ug/L); B2 was sig. higher in MN (65ug/L) and LNS (72ug/L) vs. IFA (54ug/L). In BAN all the B-vitamin concentrations were sig. increased in the breast milk of the LNS vs. the control group except for B1. Maternal MN in pregnancy and LNS in pregnancy and lactation increase BM B2 and B12; LNS in lactation alone increases BM B2, B6 and B12. However, B1 in BM is increased only by supplementation in pregnancy.