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ARS Home » Midwest Area » St. Paul, Minnesota » Soil and Water Management Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #331940

Research Project: PRACTICES TO PROTECT WATER QUALITY AND CONSERVE SOIL AND WATER RESOURCES IN AGRONOMIC AND HORTICULTURAL SYSTEMS IN THE NORTH CENTRAL US

Location: Soil and Water Management Research

Title: Performance of dentrification beds for removing nitrate from drainage water at cold temperatures

Author
item GHANE, EHSAN - University Of Minnesota
item Feyereisen, Gary
item ROSEN, CARL - University Of Minnesota
item SADOWSKY, MICHAEL - University Of Minnesota
item ISHII, SATOSHI - University Of Minnesota
item CHRISTIANSON, LAURA - University Of Illinois

Submitted to: International Drainage Symposium
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: 4/18/2016
Publication Date: 9/8/2016
Citation: Ghane, E., Feyereisen, G.W., Rosen, C.J., Sadowsky, M.J., Ishii, S., Christianson, L. 2016. Performance of dentrification beds for removing nitrate from drainage water at cold temperatures. In: Strock, Jeffrey S. Proceedings of the Tenth International Drainage Symposium. September 7-9, 2016, Minneapolis, Minnesota. p.252-255.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Transport of soluble nitrogen and phosphorus to water bodies has been a concern for many years due to human health issues, and is a major contributor to the formation of oxygen deficiency in aquatic ecosystems. Agricultural subsurface drainage is one pathway for transport of excess nutrients to surface water. Compared to other BMPs, denitrification beds (woodchip bioreactors) provide a practical solution with low maintenance and comparable expenses. The objective of this research is to investigate the performance of denitrification beds at cold temperatures to provide justification for enhancing its performance by supplementing readily available carbon (i.e., acetate), and adding cold-adapted and metabolically-active bacteria to bioreactors. We retrofitted an existing bioreactor into eight woodchip beds, providing a unique replicated experiment that allows flow control and microbial manipulation. Water samples were collected during May and June 2016 for each woodchip bed. Nitrate load reduction ranged from 2.5% to 13.4% at temperatures ranging from 8.1°C to 9.3°C. This shows that there is a need for a strategy to boost nitrate removal from drainage water at cold temperatures. Therefore, we will enhance nitrate removal by supplementing readily available carbon (i.e., acetate), and adding cold-adapted and metabolically-active bacteria to bioreactors The applied significance of this research is that it will optimize bioreactor performance, and enhance the quality of agricultural drainage water.