Skip to main content
ARS Home » Southeast Area » Raleigh, North Carolina » Soybean and Nitrogen Fixation Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #331691

Research Project: Increasing the Competitiveness of U.S. Soybeans in Global Markets through Genetic Diversity, Genomics, and Plant Breeding

Location: Soybean and Nitrogen Fixation Research

Title: Registration of Wyandot × PI 567301B soybean recombinant inbred line population

Author
item Lee, Sungwoo - North Carolina State University
item Tae-hwan, Jun - Pusan National University
item Mchale, Leah - The Ohio State University
item Michel, Andrew - The Ohio State University
item Dorrance, Anne - The Ohio State University
item Song, Qijian
item Mian, Rouf

Submitted to: Journal of Plant Registrations
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 11/15/2016
Publication Date: 5/18/2017
Citation: Lee, S., Tae-Hwan, J., Mchale, L., Michel, A., Dorrance, A., Song, Q., Mian, R.M. 2017. Registration of Wyandot × PI 567301B soybean recombinant inbred line population. Journal of Plant Registrations 11(3):324-327. doi:10.3198/jpr2016.09.0042crmp.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3198/jpr2016.09.0042crmp

Interpretive Summary: Soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr] is the second largest crop in the USA and the largest source of vegetable oil and meal protein for poultry and livestock worldwide. Large and highly advanced mapping populations with dense marker coverage are great sources for gene discovery. A soybean mapping population consisting of 357 F7-derived recombinant inbred lines (RILs) was jointly developed by the USDA-Agricultural Research Service and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC) in Wooster, OH. The population was developed by single seed descent (SSD) from a cross between cultivar Wyandot and Plant Introduction (PI) 567301B. Wyandot is a food grade cultivar released by The Ohio State University and PI 567301B is an introduction from China which differs from Wyandot for many morphological traits and also was confirmed to carry resistance to seed and seedling root rot (F. graminearum), powdery mildew (Microsphaera diffusa) and the soybean aphid (Aphis glycines Matsumura). We have used this population to map quantitative trait loci (QTL)/genes for nine traits. The 357 RILs were genotyped using BARCSoySNP6K BeadChips, and a high density linkage map with 2,545 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers well distributed on the 20 chromosomes of soybean was constructed and published recently. This mapping population is among the very few bi-parental soybean mapping populations featuring high resolution genetic maps. The mapping population, molecular map and phenotypic data should be very useful for plant breeding and genetics teaching labs and for discovery of additional QTL/gene.

Technical Abstract: A soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr] mapping population (Reg. No., SNL MAP) consisting of 357 F7-derived recombinant inbred lines (RILs) was jointly developed by the USDA-Agricultural Research Service and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC) in Wooster, OH. The population was developed by single seed descent (SSD) from a cross between cultivar Wyandot and Plant Introduction (PI) 567301B. Wyandot is a food grade cultivar released by The Ohio State University and PI 567301B is a an introduction from China which differs from Wyandot for many morphological traits and also was confirmed to carry resistance to seed and seedling root rot (F. graminearum), powdery mildew (Microsphaera diffusa) and the soybean aphid (Aphis glycines Matsumura). We have used this population to map quantitative trait loci (QTL)/genes for nine traits. The 357 RILs were genotyped using BARCSoySNP6K BeadChips, and a high density linkage map with 2,545 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers well distributed on the 20 chromosomes of soybean was constructed and published recently. This mapping population is among the very few bi-parental soybean mapping populations featuring high resolution genetic maps. We believe that the genetic map, population, and phenotypic data we provide will be an excellent resource for teaching labs in plant breeding and genetics as well as in discovery of new QTL.