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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Salinas, California » Crop Improvement and Protection Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #329113

Research Project: Genetic Enhancement of Lettuce, Spinach, Melon, and Related Species

Location: Crop Improvement and Protection Research

Title: Association analysis for oxalate concentration in spinach

Author
item Shi, Ainong - University Of Arkansas
item Mou, Beiquan
item Correll, Jim - University Of Arkansas

Submitted to: Euphytica
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 6/21/2016
Publication Date: 7/1/2016
Citation: Shi, A., Mou, B., Correll, J.C. 2016. Association analysis for oxalate concentration in spinach. Euphytica. doi: 10.1007/s10681-016-1740-0.

Interpretive Summary: In addition to its high nutrient content, spinach is also known to have greater amount of oxalic acid than most crops. Insoluble mineral oxalate crystals formed in the gut are not absorbed and are carried out with the feces, thus reducing the bioavailability and absorption of calcium and iron in diets. Human urine always contains small levels of calcium oxalate that may be deposited in the kidneys of certain people as a common form of kidney stone. Thus breeding for low-oxalate content is a major objective in spinach breeding. This research aims to identify molecular markers associated with oxalate concentration in spinach varieties. A total of 310 spinach varieties including 300 USDA gene bank accessions and ten commercial cultivars were used for the analysis of oxalate concentration. DNA sequencing was used to identify 841 molecular markers. The distribution of oxalate concentration ranged from 647.2 to 1286.9 mg/100g based on fresh weight and ranged from 53.4 to 108.8 mg/g on a dry weight basis, suggesting that the oxalate concentration in spinach is a complex trait, which may be a controlled by multiple genes with minor effect. We found six molecular markers associated with oxalate concentration. The molecular markers may be useful for breeders to select plants for oxalate concentration in spinach breeding programs through marker-assisted selection.

Technical Abstract: Screening and breeding low-oxalate germplasm is a major objective in spinach breeding. This research aims to conduct association analysis and identify SNP markers associated with oxalate concentration in spinach germplasm. A total of 310 spinach genotypes including 300 USDA germplasm accessions and ten commercial cultivars were used for the association analysis of oxalate concentration. Genotyping by sequencing (GBS) was used for genotyping and 841 SNPs from GBS were used for association analysis. The distribution of oxalate concentration showed a near normal distribution with a wide range from 647.2 to 1286.9 mg/100g based on fresh weight and ranged from 53.4 to 108.8 mg/g on a dry weight basis, suggesting that the oxalate concentration in spinach is a complex trait, which may be a quantitative trait controlled by multiple genes with minor effects. Association analysis indicated that six SNP markers, AYZV02031464 _116, AYZV02031464 _117, AYZV02031464 _95, AYZV02283363 _2707, AYZV02287123 _2830, and AYZV02296293 _852 were associated with the oxalate concentration. The SNP markers may be useful for breeders to select plants and lines for oxalate concentration in spinach breeding programs through marker-assisted selection.