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ARS Home » Plains Area » Sidney, Montana » Northern Plains Agricultural Research Laboratory » Pest Management Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #329025

Research Project: Reducing the Impact of Invasive Weeds in Northern Great Plains Rangelands through Biological Control and Community Restoration

Location: Pest Management Research

Title: Tamarix (Tamaricaceae) hybrids: most dominant invasive genotype in southern Africa

Author
item Mayonde, Samalesu - University Of Witwatersrand
item Cron, Glynis - University Of Witwatersrand
item Gaskin, John
item Byrne, Marcus - University Of Witwatersrand

Submitted to: Biological Invasions
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 8/3/2016
Publication Date: 8/11/2016
Citation: Mayonde, S.G., Cron, G.V., Gaskin, J.F., Byrne, M.J. 2016. Tamarix (Tamaricaceae) hybrids: most dominant invasive genotype in southern Africa. Biological Invasions. doi:10.1007/s10530-016-1249-4.

Interpretive Summary: Hybridization can potentially enhance invasiveness. Tamarix (Tamaricaceae) hybrids appear to be the dominant genotypes in their invasions. Exotic Tamarix are declared invasive in South Africa and the exotic T. chinensis and T. ramosissima are known to hybridize between themselves, and with the native T. usneoides. This investigation sought to identify Tamarix species in Southern Africa and their hybrids; describe their population structure and reveal the geographic origin of the invasive species. Genetic analyses confirmed the presence of three species in South Africa (T. chinensis, T. ramosissima and T. usneoides) with their hybrids. The indigenous T. usneoides is clearly genetically distant from the alien species T. chinensis and T. ramosissima. Interestingly, the Tamarix infestation in South Africa is dominated (64.7%) by hybrids between T. chinensis and T. ramosissima. The exotic species and hybrids match their counterparts from the US.

Technical Abstract: Hybridization can potentially enhance invasiveness. Tamarix (Tamaricaceae) hybrids appear to be the dominant genotypes in their invasions. Exotic Tamarix are declared invasive in South Africa and the exotic T. chinensis and T. ramosissima are known to hybridize between themselves, and with the native T. usneoides. This investigation sought to identify Tamarix species in Southern Africa and their hybrids; describe their population structure and reveal the geographic origin of the invasive species. Genetic analyses confirmed the presence of three species in South Africa (T. chinensis, T. ramosissima and T. usneoides) with their hybrids. The indigenous T. usneoides is clearly genetically distant from the alien species T. chinensis and T. ramosissima. Interestingly, the Tamarix infestation in South Africa is dominated (64.7%) by hybrids between T. chinensis and T. ramosissima. The exotic species and hybrids match their counterparts from the US.