Skip to main content
ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Salinas, California » Crop Improvement and Protection Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #327358

Research Project: Genetic Enhancement of Lettuce, Spinach, Melon, and Related Species

Location: Crop Improvement and Protection Research

Title: Assessing genetic variation in lettuce for traits related to nitrogen use efficiency using susceptibility and relative efficiency indices

Author
item Gonzalez, Miguel - University Of California
item Truco, Maria - University Of California
item Michelmore, Richard - University Of California
item Smith, Richard - University Of California - Cooperative Extension Service
item Cahn, Michael - University Of California - Cooperative Extension Service
item Simko, Ivan
item Hayes, Ryan

Submitted to: ASA-CSSA-SSSA Proceedings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: 11/14/2015
Publication Date: 11/17/2015
Citation: Gonzalez, M.M., Truco, M., Michelmore, R., Smith, R., Cahn, M., Simko, I., Hayes, R.J. 2015. Assessing genetic variation in lettuce for traits related to nitrogen use efficiency using susceptibility and relative efficiency indices. ASA, CSSA, and SSSA Annual Meeting. Available: https://scisoc.confex.com/scisoc/2015am/webprogram/Paper93179.html.

Interpretive Summary: Lettuce is a high value commodity in the USA with annual value of ~$2.5 billion. California produces ~75 percent of all lettuce in the country. Overuse of agricultural inputs for crop production can cause detrimental effects to the health of Californians as well as on agricultural and natural resources. Excess nitrogen fertilizer applications to cropping systems can lead to nitrate leaching and contamination of the ground water (Harter et. al. 2012). Some of these issues have been addressed by improving nitrogen-use-efficiency (NUE) through changing horticulture practices. The development of new lettuce varieties that are more adapted to sustaining yield in submaximal nitrogen conditions could be a useful complement to improved horticulture practices that aim to reduce excess applications of nitrogen fertilizer. The present research investigates whether genetic variation exists to improve NUE in lettuce.

Technical Abstract: Lettuce is a high value commodity in the USA with annual value of ~$2.5 billion. California produces ~75 percent of all lettuce in the country. Overuse of agricultural inputs for crop production can cause detrimental effects to the health of Californians as well as on agricultural and natural resources. Excess nitrogen fertilizer applications to cropping systems can lead to nitrate leaching and contamination of the ground water (Harter et. al. 2012). Some of these issues have been addressed by improving nitrogen-use-efficiency (NUE) through changing horticulture practices. The development of new lettuce varieties that are more adapted to sustaining yield in submaximal nitrogen conditions could be a useful complement to improved horticulture practices that aim to reduce excess applications of nitrogen fertilizer. The present research investigates whether genetic variation exists to improve NUE in lettuce.