Skip to main content
ARS Home » Southeast Area » Auburn, Alabama » Soil Dynamics Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #326556

Research Project: Sustainable Production, Profit, and Environmental Stewardship through Conservation Systems

Location: Soil Dynamics Research

Title: Weed management and herbicide resistance

Author
item Price, Andrew

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: 3/2/2017
Publication Date: 3/19/2020
Citation: Price, A.J. 2020. Weed management and herbicide resistance. In: Bergtold, J., Sailus, M., editors. Conservation tillage systems in the Southeast: Production, profitability, and stewardship. SARE Handbook Series Book 15. Sustainable Agriculture Network. p. 146-163.

Interpretive Summary: Controlling weeds in any agricultural system can be a major challenge and cost, especially without advanced preparation. Conservation tillage systems can be environmentally and economically beneficial for growers in the Southeast but weed species and management will be different than in conventional tillage systems. Although weed control can be challenging when converting to conservation tillage systems, there are many weed control options for producers to evaluate when developing their management plan. This book chapter discusses the use of several management strategies including multiple herbicide modes of action as well as crop rotations, cover crops, and other cultural practices can provide effective weed control while limiting the risk for developing herbicide resistance. With planning and timely management practices, producers can have successful weed control in conservation tillage systems.

Technical Abstract: Controlling weeds in any agricultural system can be a major challenge and cost, especially without advanced preparation. Without a weed management plan in place before planting, weeds can easily emerge and out-compete crops, reduce harvest, increase labor demands for last resort weed control such as hand weeding and hurt profits. In conservation tillage systems, weed control is more challenging than in conventional systems. Weed control strategies common in conventional systems are not options and the types of weeds change when a conservation tillage system is implemented. Conservation tillage systems can be environmentally and economically beneficial for growers in the Southeast but weed species and management will be different than in conventional tillage systems. Although weed control can be challenging when converting to conservation tillage systems, there are many weed control options for producers to evaluate when developing their management plan. The use of several management strategies including multiple herbicide modes of action as well as crop rotations, cover crops, and other cultural practices can provide effective weed control while limiting the risk for developing herbicide resistance. With planning and timely management practices, producers can have successful weed control in conservation tillage systems.