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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Salinas, California » Crop Improvement and Protection Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #326247

Research Project: Biology, Epidemiology and Management of Vector-Borne Viruses of Sugarbeet and Vegetable Crops

Location: Crop Improvement and Protection Research

Title: Application of genomics for understanding plant virus-insect vector interactions and insect vector control

Author
item Kaur, Navneet
item Hasegawa, Daniel
item Ling, Kai-Shu
item Wintermantel, William - Bill

Submitted to: Phytopathology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 7/7/2016
Publication Date: 7/20/2016
Citation: Kaur, N., Hasegawa, D.K., Ling, K., Wintermantel, W.M. 2016. Application of genomics for understanding plant virus-insect vector interactions and insect vector control. Phytopathology. doi: 10.1094/PHYTO-02-16-0111-FI.

Interpretive Summary: The ability to decipher DNA sequences is providing new insights into the study of plant viruses and their interactions with host plants, as well as the intricate interactions between viruses and their insect vectors. Next generation sequencing (NGS) of DNA of plants, and the viruses that infect them and their insect vectors provides a wealth of genetic information, and can facilitate rapid identification of viruses in plants and their insect vectors. It is now possible to begin to gain an understanding of the processes that impact virus emergence and epidemiology by decoding gene functions and identifying the types of genes and associated pathways that are activated and deactivated during virus transmission. NGS can also be used to understand abiotic or environmental impacts on plants that may influence the plant, or may even impact infection of the plant by pathogens. The implications for use of this technology toward understanding the means by which insects transmit viruses are tremendous. Furthermore, knowledge of genes and biochemical pathways involved in transmission, as well as insect viability, may lead to development of novel and biologically sound approaches for control of both vectors and viruses.

Technical Abstract: The ability to decipher DNA sequences provides new insights into the study of plant viruses and their interactions with host plants, including the intricate interactions that allow a virus to be transmitted by an insect vector. Next generation sequencing (NGS) provides a wealth of genetic information through the construction of high quality reference genomes of many insects, as well as transcriptomes associated with specific and unique conditions. NGS will facilitate rapid identification of viruses within plants and their insect vectors. It is possible to begin to gain an understanding of this critical process that impacts virus emergence and epidemiology by decoding gene functions and identifying the types of genes and associated pathways that are up- and down-regulated during virus transmission. This technology can also be used to understand abiotic or environmental impacts on plants that may influence the plant, or infection of the plant by pathogens. The implications for use of this technology toward understanding the means by which insects transmit viruses are tremendous. Furthermore, knowledge of genes and biochemical pathways involved in transmission, as well as insect viability, may lead to development of novel and biologically sound approaches for control of both vectors and viruses.