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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Salinas, California » Crop Improvement and Protection Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #325040

Research Project: Biology, Epidemiology and Management of Vector-Borne Viruses of Sugarbeet and Vegetable Crops

Location: Crop Improvement and Protection Research

Title: Cucumber leaf spot virus

Author
item Wintermantel, William - Bill

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: 4/14/2017
Publication Date: 6/15/2017
Citation: Wintermantel, W.M. 2017. Cucumber leaf spot virus. In: Keinath, A.P., Wintermantel, W.M., Zitter, T.A., editors. Compendium of Cucurbit Diseases and Pests. 2nd edition. St. Paul, MN: APS Press. p. 141-142.

Interpretive Summary: Cucumber leaf spot virus (CLSV) was originally identified from cucumber (Cucumis sativus) in Germany, but has since been found in various parts of Europe, the UK, and the Middle East, including Jordan, Saudi Arabia, Bulgaria, Poland, and Spain. CLSV is known to cause symptoms ranging from chlorotic spots to systemic mottle on cucumber and squash leaves, and some spots may develop necrotic centers. Infected melon plants develop necrotic lesions on leaves. CLSV belongs to the genus Aureusvirus within the family Tombusviridae. The CLSV genome is monopartite, and consists of a single stranded RNA approximately 4.4 kb in length that encodes five genes. CLSV can be detected serologically by ELISA, as well as using RT-PCR. CLSV is transmitted from plant-to-plant by zoospores of the chytrid fungus, Olpidium bornovanus. CLSV is also transmissible from seed of infected cucumber plants. Control of CLSV is difficult, and requires clean seed to prevent introduction of the virus to new areas. Phytosanitary measures should be used to prevent movement of soil infested with Olpidium bornovanus. It may be necessary to thoroughly clean contaminated greenhouse production facilities to prevent infection of new crops due to the exceptionally stable nature of virus particles and their ability to survive in water.

Technical Abstract: Cucumber leaf spot virus (CLSV) was originally identified from cucumber (Cucumis sativus) in Germany, but has since been found in various parts of Europe, the UK, and the Middle East, including Jordan, Saudi Arabia, Bulgaria, Poland, and Spain. CLSV is known to cause symptoms ranging from chlorotic spots to systemic mottle on cucumber and squash leaves, and some spots may develop necrotic centers. Infected melon plants develop necrotic lesions on leaves. CLSV belongs to the genus Aureusvirus within the family Tombusviridae. The CLSV genome is monopartite, and consists of a single stranded RNA approximately 4.4 kb in length that encodes five genes. CLSV can be detected serologically by ELISA, as well as using RT-PCR. CLSV is transmitted from plant-to-plant by zoospores of the chytrid fungus, Olpidium bornovanus. CLSV is also transmissible from seed of infected cucumber plants. Control of CLSV is difficult, and requires clean seed to prevent introduction of the virus to new areas. Phytosanitary measures should be used to prevent movement of soil infested with Olpidium bornovanus. It may be necessary to thoroughly clean contaminated greenhouse production facilities to prevent infection of new crops due to the exceptionally stable nature of virus particles and their ability to survive in water.