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ARS Home » Midwest Area » Madison, Wisconsin » U.S. Dairy Forage Research Center » Environmentally Integrated Dairy Management Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #325022

Research Project: Improvement of Dairy Forage and Manure Management to Reduce Environmental Risk

Location: Environmentally Integrated Dairy Management Research

Title: Effects of seeding rate on the dry matter yield and nutritive value of fall-oat

Author
item Coblentz, Wayne
item Cavadini, Jason - University Of Wisconsin

Submitted to: Crop, Forage & Turfgrass Management
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 6/20/2016
Publication Date: 9/16/2016
Citation: Coblentz, W.K., Cavadini, J.S. 2016. Effects of seeding rate on the dry matter yield and nutritive value of fall-oat. Crop, Forage & Turfgrass Management. https://dl.sciencesocieties.org/publications/cftm/articles/2/1/cftm2016.0004.

Interpretive Summary: Several recent research projects have evaluated fall-grown oat as a fall-forage option for harvest as silage, or to extend the fall grazing season. Producers frequently ask about the appropriate seeding rates for fall-grown oat and whether or not it is the same as the traditional recommendation for spring-seeded oat. The objectives of this project were to examine the effects of seeding rate and oat cultivar on subsequent dry matter yield, potential for lodging, and forage nutritive value. Two oat cultivars, one a forage type and the other a grain type, were established at various seeding rates in early August and harvested in early November. During one year of the study, the incidence of lodging was increased with seeding rate. There was little evidence of lodging exhibited by either oat cultivar during the second year of the project. Based on the results of this 2-yr study, there was no compelling evidence that dry matter yields of fall-grown oat are improved consistently by exceeding the traditional spring seeding rate. Differences in nutritive value were strongly associated with the different maturity rates for oat cultivars. The grain-type cultivar consistently reached a substantially more advanced growth stage by early November, which resulted in somewhat predictable, and negative, effects on nutritive value. This study will benefit forage producers by demonstrating that increasing seeding rates for fall oat will not consistently improve dry matter yields, and may increase the likelihood of lodging.

Technical Abstract: Several recent research projects have evaluated fall-grown oat as a fall-forage option for harvest as silage, or to extend the fall grazing season. Producers frequently ask about the appropriate seeding rates for fall-grown oat and whether or not it is the same as the traditional recommendation for spring-seeded oat. The objectives of this project were to examine the effects of seeding rate and oat cultivar on subsequent dry matter yield, potential for lodging, and forage nutritive value. Two oat cultivars, one a forage type and the other a grain type, were established at various seeding rates in early August and harvested in early November. During one year of the study, the incidence of lodging was increased with seeding rate. There was little evidence of lodging exhibited by either oat cultivar during the second year of the project. Based on the results of this 2-yr study, there was no compelling evidence that dry matter yields of fall-grown oat are improved consistently by exceeding the traditional spring seeding rate. Differences in nutritive value were strongly associated with the different maturity rates for oat cultivars. The grain-type cultivar consistently reached a substantially more advanced growth stage by early November, which resulted in somewhat predictable, and negative, effects on nutritive value. This study will benefit forage producers by demonstrating that increasing seeding rates for fall oat will not consistently improve dry matter yields, and may increase the likelihood of lodging.