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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Poplarville, Mississippi » Southern Horticultural Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #324865

Title: Chapter 9. Sanitation for Management of Florists' Crops Diseases

Author
item Copes, Warren

Submitted to: Springer Verlag
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: 12/24/2016
Publication Date: 2/2/2018
Citation: Copes, W.E. 2018. Chapter 9. Sanitation for Management of Florists’ Crops Diseases. Pages 201-236 in: Handbook of Florists' Crops Diseases. R. J. McGovern and W. H. Elmer (eds.) Springer, Berlin Heidelberg, Germany.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-32374-9_9-1

Interpretive Summary: Sanitation is an important control method used to prevent entrance of pathogens into production areas, reduce production and spread of pathogen propagules to limit disease damage in a current crop, and eliminate pathogens from production areas. The chapter provides an overview of sanitation practices known to be effective, such as purchasing disease-free certified seed and propagation material, use of weed-free zones around production areas and screens to block entry of insects that could be carriers of viruses, use of double doors and foot paths, cleaning and sanitizing production areas between crops, sanitizing tools and equipment, and removal of diseased plant material. A protocol is given to select and manage key sanitation practices that address only the more prevalent pathogens. This chapter will benefit extension personnel, crop advisers, and growers of ornamental florist crops.

Technical Abstract: Sanitation involves efforts aimed to prevent entrance of pathogens into production areas, eliminate pathogens from production areas, and reduce production and spread of pathogen propagules to limit disease damage in a current crop. Sanitation includes many practices such as purchasing disease-free certified seed and propagation material, maintaining weed-free zones around production areas, use of screens to block entry of insects, use of double doors and foot paths, cleaning and sanitizing production areas between crops, sanitizing tools and equipment, and early removal of diseased plant material. General sanitation should be a matter of routine good working habits. Because it is so important to do a thorough job, key sanitation practices should be selected that control the pathogens that routinely affect plants at a facility, and those that are prevalent and would severely impact production if introduced. Good records are an important tool to select which host-pathogens are problems, to determine cost benefit decisions, and to select subject matter for worker training modules. The information in this chapter represents an overview of methods known to be effective.