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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Griffin, Georgia » Plant Genetic Resources Conservation Unit » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #323059

Research Project: Conservation, Characterization, and Evaluation of Plant Genetic Resources and Associated Information

Location: Plant Genetic Resources Conservation Unit

Title: Characterization of newly identified natural high-oleate mutant from the USDA cultivated peanut germplasm collection

Author
item Wang, Ming
item Tonnis, Brandon
item An, Yong-qiang - Charles
item Pinnow, David
item Chen, Charles - Auburn University
item Pederson, Gary

Submitted to: Plant and Animal Genome Conference
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 10/21/2015
Publication Date: 1/9/2016
Citation: Wang, M.L., Tonnis, B.D., An, Y., Pinnow, D.L., Chen, C.Y., Pederson, G.A. 2016. Characterization of newly identified natural high-oleate mutant from the USDA cultivated peanut germplasm collection.[Abstract] Plant and Animal Genome Conference. Paper No. P1033.

Interpretive Summary: In plants and animals, natural genetic variation may exist in germplasm collection. Mining and utilizing this variation may provide benefits for new breed/cultivar development. From screening over 4,000 cultivated peanut germplasm accessions (seedbank), we identified two natural mutant lines with 80% oleic acid by gas chromatography analysis. It is known that FAD2A and FAD2B are the two major genes involved in the conversion of oleic to linoleic acid in peanuts by fatty acid desaturase. Functional mutations in one or both genes can alter the oleate level. By sequencing the coding region of these two genes, we identified a substitution of G448A in FAD2A and a substitution of C301G in FAD2B for both mutant lines. The substitution in FAD2A is the same as a previously identified one, resulting in a missense amino acid substitution of D150N; but the substitution in FAD2B is a new one, resulting in H101D. The new amino acid substitution on FAD2B is located in the first histidine box of the fatty acid desaturase and may significantly decrease its activity. Our mutants did not have flowers on the main stem (subspecies hypogaea), but F435 (a previously identified natural high oleate mutant) had flowers on the main stem (subspecies fastigiata). Therefore, we identified a class of natural mutants from the subspecies hypogaea and provided new additional genetic resources for breeders to use. Our results also demonstrate a good example of the importance and usefulness for preserving natural genetic diversity and utilizing germplasm collections.

Technical Abstract: In plants and animals, natural genetic variation may exist in germplasm collection. Mining and utilizing this variation may provide benefits for new breed/cultivar development. From screening over 4,000 cultivated peanut germplasm accessions, we identified two natural mutant lines with 80% oleic acid by gas chromatography analysis. It is known that FAD2A and FAD2B are the two major genes involved in the conversion of oleic to linoleic acid in peanuts by fatty acid desaturase. Functional mutations in one or both genes can alter the oleate level. By sequencing the coding region of these two genes, we identified a substitution of G448A in FAD2A and a substitution of C301G in FAD2B for both mutant lines. The substitution in FAD2A is the same as a previously identified one, resulting in a missense amino acid substitution of D150N; but the substitution in FAD2B is a new one, resulting in H101D. The new amino acid substitution on FAD2B is located in the first histidine box (one of the active sites) of the fatty acid desaturase and may significantly decrease its activity. Our mutants did not have flowers on the main stem (subspecies hypogaea), but F435 (a previously identified natural high oleate mutant) had flowers on the main stem (subspecies fastigiata). Therefore, we identified a class of natural mutants from the subspecies hypogaea and provided new additional genetic resources for breeders to use. Our results also demonstrate a good example of the importance and usefulness for preserving natural genetic diversity and utilizing germplasm collections.