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ARS Home » Plains Area » Grand Forks, North Dakota » Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center » Healthy Body Weight Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #322964

Research Project: Dietary Guidelines Adherence and Healthy Body Weight Maintenance

Location: Healthy Body Weight Research

Title: The relative reinforcing value of snack foods in response to consumption of sugar- or non-nutritive-sweetened beverages

Author
item Casperson, Shanon
item Johnson, Luann - University Of North Dakota
item Roemmich, James

Submitted to: Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology Conference
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 2/1/2016
Publication Date: 4/1/2016
Citation: Casperson, S.L., Johnson, L., Roemmich, J.N. 2016. The relative reinforcing value of snack foods in response to consumption of sugar- or non-nutritive-sweetened beverages [abstract]. Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology Conference, April 1-6, 2016, San Diego, California. 30:418.2.

Interpretive Summary: The effects of sugar and non-nutritive sweetener on regulation of appetite and energy intake remain controversial. Using a behavioral economic choice paradigm, we sought to determine the effects of consuming a sugar-sweetened (S) or a non-nutritive sweetened (NNS) beverage on appetite and the relative reinforcing value (RRV) of snacks foods. In a randomized crossover study, 11 normal weight adults (age=22.6±2.8; BMI=23±2) consumed 360 ml of S (31g) or NNS (sucralose; 4g) beverage with a standardized meal (500 non-beverage kcals). Hedonic (liking) ratings for high-sugar and savory snack foods were assessed prior to the start of the study. Satiety and the desire to eat sweet and savory foods were assessed before and every 30 minutes post-meal. The RRV of snack foods was assessed 4 hrs post-meal using a computer choice task (operant responding with concurrent schedules of reinforcement). Subjects could choose to earn points for 70 – 100 kcal portions of their favorite high-sugar (e.g. M&Ms) or savory (e.g. Doritos) snack food. The behavioral cost to gain access to each snack food increased on independent and concurrent log2(x) reinforcement schedules. The RRV of the snack foods was assessed as the amount of operant responding (button presses) subjects engaged in for either choice relative to the total number of responses. Hedonic ratings did not differ between the chosen high-sugar and savory snack foods. Beverage type did not influence measures of satiety or the desire to eat specific types of foods. Subjects performed an average of 364 ± 445 and 179 ± 106 button presses for high-sugar snack foods and 213 ± 252 and 518 ± 568 for savory snack foods after consuming NNS and S, respectively. The RRV of snack foods indicates that high-sugar snack foods are more reinforcing after consuming NNS and savory snack foods are more reinforcing after consuming S (p < 0.05). In conclusion, our preliminary choice and consumption results indicate that beverage type can influence the motivation to gain access to different types of foods later in the day. Study was supported by USDA ARS.

Technical Abstract: The effects of sugar and non-nutritive sweetener on regulation of appetite and energy intake remain controversial. Using a behavioral economic choice paradigm, we sought to determine the effects of consuming a sugar-sweetened (S) or a non-nutritive sweetened (NNS) beverage on appetite and the relative reinforcing value (RRV) of snacks foods. In a randomized crossover study, 11 normal weight adults (age=22.6±2.8; BMI=23±2) consumed 360 ml of S (31g) or NNS (sucralose; 4g) beverage with a standardized meal (500 non-beverage kcals). Hedonic (liking) ratings for high-sugar and savory snack foods were assessed prior to the start of the study. Satiety and the desire to eat sweet and savory foods were assessed before and every 30 minutes post-meal. The RRV of snack foods was assessed 4 hrs post-meal using a computer choice task (operant responding with concurrent schedules of reinforcement). Subjects could choose to earn points for 70 – 100 kcal portions of their favorite high-sugar (e.g. M&Ms) or savory (e.g. Doritos) snack food. The behavioral cost to gain access to each snack food increased on independent and concurrent log2(x) reinforcement schedules. The RRV of the snack foods was assessed as the amount of operant responding (button presses) subjects engaged in for either choice relative to the total number of responses. Hedonic ratings did not differ between the chosen high-sugar and savory snack foods. Beverage type did not influence measures of satiety or the desire to eat specific types of foods. Subjects performed an average of 364 ± 445 and 179 ± 106 button presses for high-sugar snack foods and 213 ± 252 and 518 ± 568 for savory snack foods after consuming NNS and S, respectively. The RRV of snack foods indicates that high-sugar snack foods are more reinforcing after consuming NNS and savory snack foods are more reinforcing after consuming S (p < 0.05). In conclusion, our preliminary choice and consumption results indicate that beverage type can influence the motivation to gain access to different types of foods later in the day. Study was supported by USDA ARS.