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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Beltsville, Maryland (BARC) » Beltsville Agricultural Research Center » Soybean Genomics & Improvement Laboratory » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #320855

Research Project: Developing Soybean and Other Legumes with Resistance to Pathogens and Assessing the Biosafety of Transgenic Soybean

Location: Soybean Genomics & Improvement Laboratory

Title: Root transformation of Glycine max with responsive promoters to nematode infection

Author
item ALZOHAIRY, A - Zagazig University
item Macdonald, Margaret - Peggy
item AMER, R - Zagazig University
item Matthews, Benjamin - Ben

Submitted to: Egyptian Journal of Genetics and Cytology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 11/1/2015
Publication Date: 1/1/2015
Citation: Alzohairy, A.M., Macdonald, M.H., Amer, R., Matthews, B.F. 2015. Root transformation of Glycine max with responsive promoters to nematode infection. Egyptian Journal of Genetics and Cytology. 44:149-164.

Interpretive Summary: The soybean cyst nematode (SCN) is the most damaging pathogen of soybean. It causes almost $1 billion in soybean yield losses annually in the United States. However, there are no soybean cultivars available that are resistant to all SCN populations. Therefore, much research is being conducted to genetically engineer soybean that is resistant to SCN. It is necessary to control the expression of genes by using gene promoters, to keep the DNA construct from being expressed at the wrong place or at the wrong time. Here we describe the expression of gene promoters in soybean roots during nematode attack. These promoters may be useful to scientists engineering soybean with resistance to SCN, because they control the expression of DNA constructs in the root during nematode invasion.

Technical Abstract: The soybean cyst nematode (SCN; Heterodera glycines), an obligate parasite of plants, is the most damaging pathogen of soybean, causing $469 to $818 million in soybean yield losses annually in the United States. However, there are no soybean cultivars available that are resistant to all SCN populations. Therefore, much research is being conducted to genetically engineer soybean cultivars for resistance to SCN. Here we describe gene promoters that may be useful in expressing DNA constructs in the soybean root during nematode attack.