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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Davis, California » Western Human Nutrition Research Center » Obesity and Metabolism Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #318788

Research Project: Improving Public Health by Understanding Diversity in Diet, Body, and Brain Interactions

Location: Obesity and Metabolism Research

Title: A potential tool for clinicians; evaluating a computer-led dietary assessment method in overweight and obese women during weight loss

Author
item Widaman, Adrianne - University Of California
item Keim, Nancy
item Burnett, Dustin - University Of California
item Miller, Beverly
item Witbract, Megan - University Of California
item Widaman, Keith - University Of California
item Laugero, Kevin

Submitted to: Nutrients
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 2/24/2017
Publication Date: 3/1/2017
Citation: Widaman, A., Keim, N.L., Burnett, D.D., Miller, B., Witbract, M.G., Widaman, K.F., Laugero, K.D. 2017. A potential tool for clinicians; evaluating a computer-led dietary assessment method in overweight and obese women during weight loss. Nutrients. doi: 10.3390:nu9030218.

Interpretive Summary: Layperson Abstract One of the most frequently applied and established research techniques for assessing typical food consumption patterns in humans is the 24 hour diet recall. However, this method is not without limitations. When applied to overweight/obese individuals, the 24 hour diet recall method has been scrutinized for underreporting total amount of energy (calories) consumed over a typical day. In this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a more recent variation of the interview assisted 24 hour diet recall, the computer-administered, 24-hour recall method (ASA24). A primary objective was to assess effectiveness of this computer-administered recall method to measure energy and nutrient intake in overweight/obese women in a post weight loss period. The study also aimed to further investigate possible causes of under- or mis-reporting food consumption by examining characteristics of food items not reported and portion size estimate errors. Actual dietary intake was compared to ASA24 reported intake in women (n=45), 19-50 y, with body mass index of 27-39.9 kg/m². Prior to this study, all participants lost 4%-10% of their initial body weight and received training in using ASA24. Participants were fed a controlled diet for 7-16 days and completed an unannounced ASA24 recall of one of these days. Energy was underreported by 5% and, for most nutrients, the magnitude of difference between actual and reported intake was not statistically different. However, we found underreporting of total carbohydrates, Vitamin B12, vitamin C and selenium and over reporting of calcium and vitamin D. Added sugar and nuts/seeds had the highest likelihood of not being reported. Portion size was overestimated for vegetables, animal protein, dairy, nuts, and fruit. We conclude that, in overweight women following weight loss, ASA24 effectively measured within 10% of actual energy (caloric) intake and nutrient intake except for vitamin B12, C and D. Omissions and errors in portion size estimates differed between food groups and eating occasions.

Technical Abstract: Background: Dietary assessment methods used in overweight/obese participants have been scrutinized for underreporting energy. Objective: Evaluate the effectiveness of a computer-administered, 24-hour recall method (ASA24) to measure energy and nutrient intake in overweight/obese women and to further investigate possible causes of mis-reporting by examining characteristics of items not reported and portion size estimate errors. Design: Actual dietary intake was compared to ASA24 reported intake in women (n=45), 19-50 y, with body mass index of 27-39.9 kg/m². Prior to this study, all participants lost 4%-10% of their initial body weight and received training in using ASA24. Participants were fed a controlled diet for 7-16 days and completed an unannounced ASA24 recall of one of these days. Intake and plate waste was measured by trained research staff. Accuracy of the recall and characteristics of respondent error was measured using linear and logistic regression. Results: Energy was underreported by 5% and did not differ from zero (p=0.051). For most nutrients the magnitude of difference between actual and reported intake was not statistically different with the exception of underreporting of total carbohydrates, Vitamin B12, vitamin C and selenium (p=0.002, p<0.0001, p=0.022, and p= 0.010, respectively) and over reporting of calcium and vitamin D (p=0.008 and p=0.001). Added sugar and nuts/seeds had the highest odds of not being reported (OR4.06, 95% CI:2.28,7.22 and OR1.80, 95% CI:1.18,2.76). Portion size was overestimated for vegetables, animal protein, dairy, nuts, and fruit and underestimated during dinner by an average of 48%, 33%, 28%, 27%, 22% and -20% respectively. Conclusion: In obese women following weight loss, ASA24 effectively captured within 10% of actual energy and nutrient intake except for vitamin B12, C and D. Omissions and errors in portion size estimates differed between food groups and eating occasions.