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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Beltsville, Maryland (BHNRC) » Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center » Food Composition and Methods Development Laboratory » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #315629

Research Project: Metabolite Profiling and Chemical Fingerprinting Methods for Characterization of Foods, Botanical Supplements, and Biological Materials

Location: Food Composition and Methods Development Laboratory

Title: Influence of gelatinization on the extraction of phenolic acids from wheat fractions

Author
item Lu, Yingjian - University Of Maryland
item Luthria, Devanand - Dave

Submitted to: Food Chemistry
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 6/1/2015
Publication Date: 8/19/2015
Citation: Lu, Y., Luthria, D.L. 2015. Influence of gelatinization on the extraction of phenolic acids from wheat fractions. Food Chemistry. 194:1138-42.

Interpretive Summary: Accurate quantification of phytochemicals is of significant importance for evaluation of their bioactivity and establishment of proper dietary intake and safety guidelines. In this study, we investigated the effects of gelatinization on the extraction of phenolic phytochemicals from wheat bran (starch content: ~15%), whole-wheat (starch content: ~70%), and refined wheat flour (starch content: ~80%) (USDA, 2014). Two common extraction methodologies (UAE and MAE) routinely applied for the analysis of phenolic acids were used to investigate the impact of gelatinization on extraction of bioactive phenolic acids from the three wheat samples. The results showed that starch gelatinization reduces the extractability of phenolic acids from wheat flour samples.

Technical Abstract: The effect of gelatinization on the analysis of phenolic acids from wheat bran, whole-wheat, and refined flour samples was investigated using two extraction procedures, namely, ultrasonic (UAE) and microwave (MAE). The total phenolic acid (TPA) concentration quantity in wheat bran (2711-2913 µg/g) was significantly higher than the whole (664-715 µg/g) and refined wheat (109-112 µg/g) flour samples by both extraction methods as analyzed by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. The recovery of phenolic acids from the spiked wheat bran sample was higher than from either the whole or refined wheat flour samples by both extraction procedures. The recovery of TPA (74-89%) from whole and refined wheat flours by MAE) was significantly lower than that of UAE) (90-98%). This difference was attributed to the gelatinization of starch present in the wheat flours. Gelatinization reduces the extractability of phenolic acids from wheat flour samples