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ARS Home » Plains Area » Clay Center, Nebraska » U.S. Meat Animal Research Center » Nutrition and Environmental Management Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #315149

Research Project: Improved Nutrient Efficiency of Beef Cattle and Swine

Location: Nutrition and Environmental Management Research

Title: Effects of dry-rolled or high-moisture corn with twenty-five or forty-five percent wet distillers' grains with solubles on energy metabolism, nutrient digestibility, and macromineral balance in finishing beef steers

Author
item Hales, Kristin
item Jaderborg, J - University Of Minnesota
item Crawford, G - University Of Minnesota
item Dicostanzo, A - University Of Minnesota
item Spiehs, Mindy
item Brown Brandl, Tami
item Freetly, Harvey

Submitted to: Journal of Animal Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 9/10/2015
Publication Date: 10/9/2015
Publication URL: http://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/61634
Citation: Hales, K.E., Jaderborg, J.P., Crawford, G.I., DiCostanzo, A., Spiehs, M.J., Brown-Brandl, T.M., Freetly, H.C. 2015. Effects of dry-rolled or high-moisture corn with twenty-five or forty-five percent wet distillers' grains with solubles on energy metabolism, nutrient digestibility, and macromineral balance in finishing beef steers. Journal of Animal Science. 93(10):4995-5005. doi: 10.2527/jas2015-9301

Interpretive Summary: An experiment was done using 8 beef steers to evaluate different grain processing methods and distillers grains inclusion levels on cattle metabolism and nutrient and mineral digestibility. Grain processing methods used were dry-rolled or high-moisture corn. Distillers grains were included in the diet at 25 or 45%. Cattle consuming diets with high-moisture corn lost more nutrients in the feces than cattle consuming diets with dry-rolled corn. Cattle consuming diets with dry-rolled corn and 25% distillers grains produced more methane than cattle consuming diets with dry-rolled corn and 45% distillers grains. Diets with dry-rolled corn were more digestible than diets with high-moisture corn. Sulfur intake increased when distillers grains were increased from 25 to 45% of the diet. Nitrogen lost in the urine and feces were greater when 45% vs. 25% distillers grains were fed. In conclusion, if the concentrate grain portion of the diet is poorly digestible adding a greater amount of distillers grains can increase the amount of energy retained by the animal and sulfur intake generally increases as distillers grains increase in the diet.

Technical Abstract: The effects of feeding dry-rolled corn (DRC) or high-moisture corn (HMC) with 25% and 45% wet distillers grains with solubles (WDGS) on energy metabolism, and nutrient and mineral balance were evaluated in 8 finishing beef steers using a replicated Latin square design. The model included the fixed effects of dietary treatment, the WDGS × grain processing interaction, and period; whereas, random effects of square and steer within square were also included. Treatments consisted of a DRC-based diet with 25% WDGS, a DRC-based diet with 45% WDGS, a 2:1 combination of HMC and DRC with 25% WDGS, a 2:1 combination of HMC and DRC with 45% WDGS. Cattle consuming DRC diets consumed a greater amount of DM and GE intake was also greater when feeding DRC with 25% vs. 45% WDGS. As a proportion of GE intake, cattle consuming HMC had a greater fecal energy loss (P = 0.01). Digestible energy loss as a proportion of GE intake, was greater when cattle were fed DRC vs. HMC diets (P = 0.01) and when WDGS was included at 45% of DM (P = 0.05). As a proportion of GE intake, cattle consuming DRC diets and 25% WDGS respired a greater amount of methane than cattle consuming diets with 45% WDGS. As a proportion of GE intake, ME was greater in DRC than HMC diets (P = 0.01). Within HMC diets, 45% WDGS had greater Mcal of RE than 25% WDGS. Nitrogen excretion was greater in the urine (P < 0.01) and feces (P < 0.05) when 45% WDGS was included. As a proportion of N intake, total N retained was greater when a greater amount of WDGS was included in the diet (P = 0.05). Dry matter digestibility was greater in DRC- than HMC-based diets (P = 0.02). Starch intake, excretion, and digestibility as a proportion of intake were greater in DRC-based than HMC-based diets (P < 0.01) and when WDGS was included at 25% vs. 45% of the diet (P < 0.01). Intake of ether extract was greater in HMC diets when 45% WDGS was included (P < 0.01), and fecal excretion was greater in diets including 25% WDGS than diets including 45% WDGS (P = 0.02). Sulfur intake was greater as the inclusion of WDGS increased from 25% to 45% (P < 0.01). From our data we interpret that if the basal concentrate portion of the diet is poorly digestible adding a greater amount WDGS can improve RE, and within DRC diets more energy is retained as fat and carbohydrate when cattle were fed 25% WDGS. Furthermore, N excretion is greater in both the urine and feces and sulfur intake also increases as WDGS increases in the diet.