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ARS Home » Plains Area » Fargo, North Dakota » Edward T. Schafer Agricultural Research Center » Animal Metabolism-Agricultural Chemicals Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #314591

Research Project: METABOLIC FATE OF CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL CONTAMINANTS

Location: Animal Metabolism-Agricultural Chemicals Research

Title: Flunixin urine residues in culled dairy cows and its relevance to food safety and environmental concerns

Author
item Shelver, Weilin
item Smith, David
item Tell, Lisa - University Of California
item Baynes, Ronald - North Carolina State University
item Schroeder, J - North Dakota State University
item Riviere, Jim - Kansas State University

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 5/12/2015
Publication Date: N/A
Citation: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Flunixin is a US-FDA approved non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent; it is prominent due to violative meat residues detected by the US-FSIS in dairy cows. The effects of route of administration (2.2 mg/kg) and endotoxin challenge on flunixin elimination and residues were investigated. High urinary flunixin concentrations (> 100,000 ng/mL) were measured in 30%, 70%, and 90% of cows on dosing days 1, 2, and 3, respectively (2 h post-dose). The cow with the highest 96-h withdrawal urinary flunixin level had violative milk and liver flunixin residues; the cow having the second highest urinary flunixin had violative milk residues. At the 96-h withdrawal period, flunixin concentrations were > LOQ in 45% of plasma and in 100% of urine samples. Urinary flunixin concentrations were not significantly altered by dosing route or endotoxin, but the endotoxin treated cows had higher flunixin/5OH-flunixin ratios. These data suggest urine could be an alternative to predict violative flunixin residues.

Technical Abstract: Flunixin is a US-FDA approved non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent; it is prominent due to violative meat residues detected by the US-FSIS in dairy cows. The effects of route of administration (2.2 mg/kg) and endotoxin challenge on flunixin elimination and residues were investigated. High urinary flunixin concentrations (> 100,000 ng/mL) were measured in 30%, 70%, and 90% of cows on dosing days 1, 2, and 3, respectively (2 h post-dose). The cow with the highest 96-h withdrawal urinary flunixin level had violative milk and liver flunixin residues; the cow having the second highest urinary flunixin had violative milk residues. At the 96-h withdrawal period, flunixin concentrations were > LOQ in 45% of plasma and in 100% of urine samples. Urinary flunixin concentrations were not significantly altered by dosing route or endotoxin, but the endotoxin treated cows had higher flunixin/5OH-flunixin ratios. These data suggest urine could be an alternative to predict violative flunixin residues.