Skip to main content
ARS Home » Southeast Area » Tifton, Georgia » Crop Genetics and Breeding Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #313862

Research Project: Genetic Enhancement and Management of Warm-Season Species for Forage, Turf and Renewable Energy

Location: Crop Genetics and Breeding Research

Title: Identification and mapping of a single recessive gene that confers resistance to the white sugarcane aphid in sorghum

Author
item CATO, CAITLIN - Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College
item Wang, Hongliang
item Harris-Shultz, Karen
item DUNKLEY, KINGSLEY - Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College
item Anderson, William - Bill
item Ni, Xinzhi
item Knoll, Joseph - Joe

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 1/25/2015
Publication Date: 7/1/2015
Citation: Cato, C., Wang, H., Harris-Shultz, K.R., Dunkley, K., Anderson, W.F., Ni, X., Knoll, J.E. 2015. Identification and mapping of a single recessive gene that confers resistance to the white sugarcane aphid in sorghum. 6th Annual Meeting of the Association of Southeastern Biologists, Chattanooga, TN, April 1-4, 2015. Southeastern Biology Volume 62, Issue 3. p. 409.

Interpretive Summary: not required

Technical Abstract: Known for its resilience in arid environments, sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) is a multi-functioning staple food crop grown around the world. Sorghum produces grain, sugar, and cellulose-material that can be used for: livestock feed, human consumption, ethanol production, and building materials. Despite its drought and heat resistance, sorghum still succumbs to fungal, insect, bacterial, and viral damage. White sugarcane aphids (Melanaphis sacchari) are prevalent in the southeastern United States and are rapidly spreading north. The white sugarcane aphid recently switched hosts from sugarcane to sorghum and heavily impacts sorghum yields. Aphids are grass-feeding insects that produce a sugary substance called honeydew, which enables the growth of sooty mold on plants. The mold further reduces yields by reducing the amount of sunlight available to plant leaves and clogs harvest equipment. The utilization of hybrid sorghum with resistance to the sugarcane aphid would be desirable. A previous study identified a dominant gene (RMES1) that confers resistance to the sugarcane aphid in a grain sorghum line. In this study, a sweet sorghum line was identified, Entry 22, that has resistance to the white sugarcane aphid. Crosses with this line with susceptible line AN109 and developed of an F2 population revealed that the resistance is conferred by a single recessive gene. Experiments are currently ongoing to determine if linkage exists between RMES1 and the newly identified recessive resistance gene.