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ARS Home » Midwest Area » St. Paul, Minnesota » Soil and Water Management Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #304283

Research Project: PRACTICES TO PROTECT WATER QUALITY AND CONSERVE SOIL AND WATER RESOURCES IN AGRONOMIC AND HORTICULTURAL SYSTEMS IN THE NORTH CENTRAL US

Location: Soil and Water Management Research

Title: Sorption and desorption of indaziflam degradates in several agricultural soils

Author
item ALONSO, DIEGO - University Of Maringa
item OLIVEIRA, RUBEM - University Of Maringa
item Koskinen, William
item CONSTANTIN, JAMIL - University Of Maringa
item HALL, KATHLEEN - University Of Minnesota
item MISLANKAR, SURESH - Bayer Cropscience

Submitted to: Scientia Agricola
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 7/20/2015
Publication Date: 4/1/2016
Citation: Alonso, D.G., Oliveira, R.S., Koskinen, W.C., Constantin, J., Hall, K.E., Mislankar, S. 2016. Sorption and desorption of indaziflam degradates in several agricultural soils. Scientia Agricola. 73(2):169-176.

Interpretive Summary: Processes regulating pesticide fate in the environment are influenced by the physicochemical properties of pesticides and soils. Sorption-desorption are important processes as they regulate movement of pesticides in soil. Although sorption-desorption is widely studied for herbicides, studies involving their metabolites in soil are scarce. Sorption and desorption of indaziflam metabolites (indaziflam-triazinediamine (FDAT), indaziflam-triazine-indanone (ITI) and indaziflam-carboxilic acid (ICA)) were investigated in six Brazilian (BRA) soils and three American (USA) soils with different physicochemical properties. Sorption order (Kf) was ITI > ICA > FDAT. These results suggest that these metabolites are classified from mobile to moderately mobile soils. Desorption was hysteretic for all metabolites in all soils, that is once bound to soil, they did not readily desorb. Desorption data indicate that using sorption data to describe offsite movement in soil would overpredict offsite movement. These data will facilitate regulators' determination of potential offsite mivement of these chemicals.

Technical Abstract: Processes regulating pesticide fate in the environment are influenced by the physicochemical properties of pesticides and soils. Sorption-desorption are important processes as they regulate movement of pesticides in soil. Although sorption-desorption is widely studied for herbicides, studies involving their metabolites in soil are scarce. Sorption and desorption of indaziflam metabolites (indaziflam-triazinediamine (FDAT), indaziflam-triazine-indanone (ITI) and indaziflam-carboxilic acid (ICA)) were investigated in six Brazilian (BRA) soils and three American (USA) soils with different physicochemical properties. The Freundlich equation described the sorption of the metabolites for all soils (R2 > 0.98; 1/n ~ 1). Sorption order (Kf) was ITI > ICA > FDAT. Mean values of Kf,oc were 453, 289, and 81 (BRA) and 444, 48, and 48 (USA) for metabolites ITI, ICA, and FDAT respectively. Desorption was hysteretic for all metabolites in all soils. These results suggest that these metabolites are classified from mobile to moderately mobile soils.