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ARS Home » Midwest Area » Bowling Green, Kentucky » Food Animal Environmental Systems Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #304254

Research Project: Efficient Management and Use of Animal Manure to Protect Human Health and Environmental Quality

Location: Food Animal Environmental Systems Research

Title: Modeling the effect of heat fluxes on ammonia and nitrous oxide emissions from an anaerobic swine waste treatment lagoon using artificial neural network

Author
item Lovanh, Nanh
item Quintana, Arturo - Western Kentucky University
item Rysz, Maciej - University Of Iowa
item Loughrin, John
item Mahmood, Rezaul - Western Kentucky University
item Oh, Byung-taek - Chonbuk National University

Submitted to: American Chemical Society National Meeting
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 6/10/2014
Publication Date: 8/10/2014
Citation: Lovanh, N.C., Quintana, A., Rysz, M., Loughrin, J.H., Mahmood, R., Oh, B. 2014. Modeling the effect of heat fluxes on ammonia and nitrous oxide emissions from an anaerobic swine waste treatment lagoon using artificial neural network. American Chemical Society National Meeting. Abstract.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Understanding factors that affect ammonia and nitrous emissions from anaerobic swine waste treatment lagoons or any animal waste receptacles is a necessary first step in deploying potential remediation options. In this study, we examined the various meteorological factors (i.e., air temperatures, solar radiation, and heat fluxes) that potentially affect ammonia and nitrous oxide emissions from swine waste lagoon. Ammonia and nitrous oxide concentrations were monitored using a photoacoustic gas analyzer. The ammonia and nitrous oxide emissions from the lagoon were monitored continuously for a twenty-four hour cycle, twice a week during a winter month at a height of fifty centimeters above the lagoon surface. Meteorological data were also monitored simultaneously. Heat fluxes were tabulated and correlated to the averaged ammonia and nitrous oxide concentrations. Multi-layer perceptron (MLP) neural network predictive model was built based on the most important meteorological parameters. The results from MLP neural networks analysis show that ammonia and nitrous oxide emissions from the swine waste lagoon were affected by heat fluxes such as net solar radiation, sensible heat, and latent heat of vaporization. Thus it is important to consider environmental conditions (i.e., meteorological parameters such as solar radiation, latent heat and etc.) in formulating management or abatement strategies for reducing ammonia and nitrous oxide emissions from swine waste lagoons or any other air pollutant emissions from livestock waste receptacles.