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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Salinas, California » Crop Improvement and Protection Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #299164

Research Project: Biology, Epidemiology and Management of Vector-Borne Viruses of Sugarbeet and Vegetable Crops

Location: Crop Improvement and Protection Research

Title: Epidemiology of Blackberry yellow vein associated virus

Author
item POUDEL, BINDU - University Of Arkansas
item Wintermantel, William - Bill
item Cortez, Arturo - Art
item HO, THIEN - University Of Arkansas
item KHADGI, A - University Of Arkansas
item TZANETAKIS, IOANNIS - University Of Arkansas

Submitted to: Plant Disease
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 3/29/2013
Publication Date: 9/15/2013
Citation: Poudel, B., Wintermantel, W.M., Cortez, A.A., Ho, T., Khadgi, A., Tzanetakis, I.E. 2013. Epidemiology of Blackberry yellow vein associated virus. Plant Disease. 97:1352-1357.

Interpretive Summary: Blackberry yellow vein disease is one of the most important diseases of blackberry in the United States. Several viruses are found associated with the symptomology but Blackberry yellow vein associated virus (BYVaV) appears to be the most prevalent of all, leading to the need for a better understanding of its epidemiology. Efficient detection protocols were developed using end-point and quantitative reverse transcription PCR. A multi-state survey was performed on wild and cultivated blackberry to assess the geographical distribution of the virus. Two whitefly species, Trialeurodes abutilonea and T. vaporariorum, were identified as efficient vectors and 25 plant species were tested as potential BYVaV hosts. The information obtained in this study can be utilized at multiple levels to better understand and control blackberry yellow vein disease.

Technical Abstract: Blackberry yellow vein disease is one of the most important diseases of blackberry in the United States. Several viruses are found associated with the symptomology but Blackberry yellow vein associated virus (BYVaV) appears to be the most prevalent of all, leading to the need for a better understanding of its epidemiology. Efficient detection protocols were developed using end-point and quantitative reverse transcription PCR. A multi-state survey was performed on wild and cultivated blackberry to assess the geographical distribution of the virus. Two whitefly species, Trialeurodes abutilonea and T. vaporariorum, were identified as efficient vectors and 25 plant species were tested as potential BYVaV hosts. The information obtained in this study can be utilized at multiple levels to better understand and control blackberry yellow vein disease.