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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Pullman, Washington » Animal Disease Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #295695

Research Project: Immunological Intervention of Malignant Catarrhal Fever Virus-Induced Disease in Ruminants

Location: Animal Disease Research

Title: Viral hemorrhagic fevers of animals caused by DNA viruses

Author
item Borca, Manuel
item Gay, Cyril
item RISATTI, G - University Of Connecticut
item O'TOOLE, G - University Of Wyoming
item Li, Hong
item KUHN, J - National Institutes Of Health (NIH)
item LEWIS, C - Diagnostic Virology Laboratory/ National Veterinary Services Laboratories
item LOIACONO, C - Diagnostic Virology Laboratory/ National Veterinary Services Laboratories
item White, David

Submitted to: Global Virology-Identifying and Investigating Viral Diseases
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: 3/29/2015
Publication Date: 7/14/2015
Citation: Borca, M.V., Gay, C.G., Risatti, G., O'Toole, G., Li, H., Kuhn, J., Lewis, C., Loiacono, C., White, D.M. 2015. Viral hemorrhagic fevers of animals caused by DNA viruses. In:Shapshak, P., Sinnott, J.T., Somboonwit, C., Kuhn, J., editors. Global Virology-Identifying and Investigating Viral Diseases. New York, NY:Springer. p. 319-343.

Interpretive Summary: The chapter on Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers of Animals in: Global Virology--Identifying and Investigating Viral Diseases mainly outlines two important viral diseases of animals that cause damaging economic effects on producers worldwide: African swine fever and malignant catarrhal fever. This chapter generally describes the diseases including their etiology, host range, transmission, pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis and control.

Technical Abstract: Here we outline serious diseases of food and fiber animals that cause damaging economic effects on producers all over the world. The only vector-borne DNA virus is included here (i.e., African swine fever virus), and the herpesviruses discussed have a complex epidemiology characterized by outbreaks that are linked to differing susceptibility of related animals to infection and/or disease. Much work remains to be done to fully explain the genetic and ecological determinants of disease for these complex viruses.