Skip to main content
ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Pullman, Washington » Grain Legume Genetics Physiology Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #293596

Title: Registration of CA0469C025C chickpea germplasm

Author
item Vandemark, George
item Muehlbauer, Frederick
item Mihov, Miho - Dobroudja Agricultural Institute
item Chen, Weidong
item Mcphee, Kevin - North Dakota State University
item Chengci, Chen - Montana State University

Submitted to: Journal of Plant Registrations
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 9/23/2013
Publication Date: 8/25/2014
Citation: Vandemark, G.J., Muehlbauer, F.J., Mihov, M., Chen, W., Mcphee, K., Chengci, C. 2014. Registration of CA0469C025C chickpea germplasm. Journal of Plant Registrations. 8:303-307. doi: 10.3198/jpr2013.09.0057crg.

Interpretive Summary: Chickpea was among the first crops to be domesticated during the advancement of Neolithic culture that occurred approximately 8000-12,000 years ago in riparian societies along the Euphrates and Tigris rivers. Chickpeas have been historically grown in rotations with wheat and barley, which confer several benefits to small grain production including the disruption of cereal disease cycles and increasing availability of residual nitrogen produced in chickpea roots. Chickpeas are primarily grown in the United States in WA and ID, with lesser amounts in CA, CO, MT, NE, and ND. There has been considerable increased global and domestic demand for chickpeas over recent years. The amount of area of chickpeas harvested in the United States has increased from approximately 51,000 ha in 2007 to nearly 86,000 ha in 2012, while over the same time the total annual value of chickpeas produced in the United States has soared from $44 million in 2007 to $125 million in 2012. The chickpea germplasm CA0469C025C was released by the USDA-ARS in September 2010. In the Pacific Northwest, CA0469C025C averaged 1636 kg/ha, which was 16.5%, 17.2%, and 7.1% greater than yields of the popular commercial varieties Dwelley, Sierra and Sawyer, respectively. CA0469C025C also has improved tolerance to Ascochyta blight. CA0469C025C produces seed that is too small for commercial production but should serve as an excellent source of genes for developing new chickpea varieties with higher yields and improved disease resistance.

Technical Abstract: Chickpea (Cicer arientinum L.) germplasm CA0469C025C (Reg. No. XXX; PI XXX), was released by the USDA-ARS in 2010. CA0469C025C was released based on its improved yield and reaction to Ascochyta blight relative to the popular commercial cultivars ‘Dwelley’, ‘Sierra’, and ‘Sawyer’. CA0490C025C is derived from the selection of a F7 line resulting from an Obraztsov Chiflik 1/‘Sanford’ cross. CA0469C025C was tested in advanced yield trials for a total of 16 location-years in the US Pacific Northwest (ID and WA) and four location-years in Montana, an emerging area for chickpea production. In the Pacific Northwest, CA0469C025C averaged 1636 kg/ha, which was 16.5%, 17.2%, and 7.1% greater than Dwelley, Sierra and Sawyer, respectively. In trials conducted in Montana, CA0469C025C averaged 1403 kg/ha, which was 38.5%, 28.2%, and 12.5% greater than Dwelley, Sierra and Sawyer, respectively. CA0469C025C has similar height and lodging tolerance compared to the check cultivars. CA0469C025C also has improved tolerance to Ascochyta blight relative to the cultivars Sierra and Dwelley, especially under conditions of severe disease pressure. CA0469C025C produces seed that is too small for canning or fresh markets, but will be useful as a parent for breeding programs that are developing improved chickpea lines and cultivars that have high yield and enhanced tolerance to Ascochyta blight.