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ARS Home » Plains Area » Grand Forks, North Dakota » Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center » Healthy Body Weight Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #275688

Title: Feeding practices correlated with authoritative parenting style and responsive feeding style scores

Author
item Dickin, Katherine - Cornell University - New York
item Hubbs-tait, Laura - Oklahoma State University
item Sigman-grant, Madeline - University Of Nevada
item Jahns, Lisa
item Mobley, Amy - University Of Connecticut

Submitted to: Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology Conference
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 11/14/2011
Publication Date: 3/29/2012
Citation: Dickin, K.L., Hubbs-Tait, L., Sigman-Grant, M., Jahns, L.A., Mobley, A. 2012. Feeding practices correlated with authoritative parenting style and responsive feeding style scores. Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology Conference. 26:1011.14.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Study objective was to identify correlations of authoritative parenting and responsive feeding styles with parental practices and child behaviors previously found to protect children from or increase risk of child obesity. Participants were 144 low-income mothers of 3- to 5-year-old children (71 girls, 73 boys). Feeding practices measures were Healthy Children Healthy Families Behavior Checklist and Parental Overt and Covert Control. Caregiver’s Feeding Style Questionnaire and Preschool Behavior Questionnaire–Head Start measured feeding and parenting styles. Authoritative parenting style continuous scores were correlated with child active play, r = .252, p =.002, low frequency of child drinking soda, r=.388, p<.001, and maternal covert control items. Responsive feeding style scores were correlated with frequencies of child eating fruit, r=.268, p = .004, vegetables, r=.215, p=.01, and eating together with mother, r=.178, p=.03. Both authoritative parenting and responsive feeding style scores were correlated with low child screen time and fast food intake, p<.05. Results show parenting and feeding styles are linked not only to similar but also to unique risk and protective behaviors and practices.