Skip to main content
ARS Home » Southeast Area » Mississippi State, Mississippi » Crop Science Research Laboratory » Genetics and Sustainable Agriculture Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #273684

Title: Litter ammonia losses amplified by higher air flow rates

Author
item Miles, Dana
item Rowe, Dennis - Mississippi State University
item Moore, Philip

Submitted to: Journal of Applied Poultry Research
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 5/25/2012
Publication Date: 12/1/2012
Publication URL: http://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/55599
Citation: Miles, D.M., Rowe, D.E., Moore Jr., P.A. 2012. Litter ammonia losses amplified by higher air flow rates. Journal of Applied Poultry Research. 21:874-880.

Interpretive Summary: Broiler litter utilization has largely been associated with land application as fertilizer. Reducing ammonia released from litter increases nitrogen content (fertilizer value) and negates detrimental impacts to the environment. A laboratory study was conducted to quantify the effect of air flow variation on litter ammonia volatilization. Increasing air flow rate provided more ammonia capture. The lower flow rates, 50 and 100 ml/min, generated 59% and 86%, respectively, of the ammonia captured at the highest flow rate (150 ml/min). By specifically studying flow rate, the results provide a basis for needed mitigation technologies to combine forced ventilation with other parameters known to increase ammonia generation (e.g. high temperature). Practical applications to reduce ammonia emissions on the farm may include covering litter stockpiles to reduce wind flow over them or use of intense ventilation between flocks while using an ammonia scrubber.

Technical Abstract: ABSTRACT Broiler litter utilization has largely been associated with land application as fertilizer. Reducing ammonia (NH3) released from litter enhances its fertilizer value and negates detrimental impacts to the environment. A laboratory study was conducted to quantify the effect of air flow variation on litter NH3 volatilization. Increasing air flow rate provided more NH3 capture. The lower flow rates, 50 and 100 ml/min, generated 59% and 86% of the NH3 captured, respectively, as compared to the highest flow rate (150 ml/min). By specifically studying flow rate, the results provide a basis for needed mitigation technologies to combine forced ventilation with other parameters known to increase NH3 generation (e.g. elevated temperature). Practical applications to reduce NH3 emissions on the farm may include covering litter stockpiles to reduce wind flow over them or use of intense ventilation between flocks while using an NH3 scrubber.