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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Fort Pierce, Florida » U.S. Horticultural Research Laboratory » Subtropical Plant Pathology Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #236132

Title: The interactions of Tropical soda apple mosaic tobamovirus and Gratiana boliviana (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), an introduced biological control agent of tropical soda apple (Solanum viarum)

Author
item OVERHOLT, W. A.
item MARKLE, L.
item Rosskopf, Erin
item MANRIQUE, V.
item Albano, Joseph
item CAVE, E.
item Adkins, Scott

Submitted to: Weed Science Society of America Meeting Abstracts
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 10/11/2011
Publication Date: 2/7/2009
Citation: Overholt, W., Markle, L., Rosskopf, E.N., Manrique, V., Albano, J.P., Cave, E., Adkins, S.T. 2009. The interactions of Tropical soda apple mosaic tobamovirus and Gratiana boliviana (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), an introduced biological control agent of tropical soda apple (Solanum viarum). Weed Science Society of America Meeting Abstracts.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Tropical soda apple (Solanum viarum Dunal (Solanaceae) (TSA) is a South American invasive plant of rangelands, pastures and natural areas in Florida. A chrysomelid beetle from South America, Gratiana boliviana Spaeth, has been released at >300 locations in Florida for biological control of TSA since 2003. TSA is a host of several plant viruses, including the newly described Tropical soda apple mosaic virus (TSAMV). We investigated the influence of TSAMV infection of TSA plants on developmental time, leaf tissue consumption, longevity, fecundity and feeding preference of G. boliviana, and also tested transmission of the virus by the beetle. Developmental time was approximately 10% slower when beetles were fed on infected plants, and adults consumed only about 50% as much leaf tissue compared to uninfected plants. Longevity did not differ between females reared on infected and uninfected plants, but females fed on uninfected plants produced 71% more eggs than those fed on infected plants. Adult G. boliviana preferentially fed on uninfected plants when given a choice. There was no evidence of TSAMV transmission by G. boliviana. The potential impacts of TSAMV infection on the effectiveness of G. boliviana as a biological control agent are discussed.