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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Prevalence and Level of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in Feces and On Hides of Feedlot Steers Fed Diets With or Without Wet Distillers Grains With Solubles)

Author
item Wells, James - Jim
item Shackelford, Steven
item Berry, Elaine
item Kalchayanand, Norasak - Nor
item Varel, Vincent
item Arthur, Terrance
item Bosilevac, Joseph - Mick
item Freetly, Harvey
item Wheeler, Tommy
item Ferrell, Calvin
item Koohmaraie, Mohammad

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract only
Publication Acceptance Date: 2/18/2009
Publication Date: 4/22/2009
Publication URL: doi 10.1007/s00248-009-9496-x
Citation: Wells, J., Shackelford, S.D., Berry, E.D., Kalchayanand, N., Varel, V.H., Arthur, T.M., Bosilevac, J.M., Freetly, H.C., Wheeler, T.L., Ferrell, C.L., Koohmaraie, M. 2009. Prevalence and Level of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in Feces and On Hides of Feedlot Steers Fed Diets With or Without Wet Distillers Grains With Solubles [abstract]. Microbial Ecology 57(3):583-584.

Interpretive Summary: No interpretive summary is required.

Technical Abstract: Studies have indicated distillers grains in cattle diets may alter the shedding of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in feces, thereby increasing the E. coli O157:H7 load on the hide and ultimately on the carcass. To determine if wet distillers grains with solubles (WDGS) in the diet affected E. coli O157:H7 in growing and finishing cattle, weaned steers (n = 603) were blocked by genetic lines and weaning weight, and randomly assigned to dietary treatments (with and without WDGS). At approximately 53 days after weaning, steers were sorted into 8 pens (4 pens per treatment) with 75 to 77 steers per pen. Growing diets with 0% or 13.9% WDGS (as %DM) were fed beginning on d 0 and finishing diets with 0% or 40% WDGS were fed beginning on d 78. Hide and fecal samples were collected from each animal for enumeration and enrichment of E. coli O157:H7 from October through June. In the growing phase, the fecal prevalence for E. coli O157:H7 was twice that in animals fed diets with 13.9% WDGS (P < 0.001), but neither the percentage nor the distribution of E. coli O157:H7 enumerable samples in feces was different for the two diets. In the finishing phase, average fecal prevalence for cattle fed 40% WDGS was 14.9% compared to 1.5% for animals fed corn (P < 0.001), and hide prevalence was 32.8 and 9.2% (P < 0.001), respectively. The average percentage of fecal E. coli O157:H7 enumerable samples during the finishing phase for cattle fed 40% WDGS was 2.7% compared to 0.1% for corn (P < 0.001). The average percentage of E. coli O157:H7 enumerable hide samples was not different (1.9 vs 0.0%, P < 0.06), but the distributions of these counts were different (P < 0.05). Animals fed 40% WDGS had higher levels of generic E. coli (P < 0.001), higher pH (P < 0.001), and lower concentrations of L-lactate (P < 0.001) in their feces. Within cattle fed 40% WDGS, fecal shedding of E. coli O157:H7 was not associated with fecal pH. However, fecal shedding of E. coli O157:H7 from the cattle fed 40% WDGS was associated with lower levels of fecal generic E. coli (6.94 vs 7.06 log10 CFU per g, P < 0.05) and higher fecal concentrations of L-lactate (1.87 vs 1.39 mM, P < 0.01). These results indicate that feeding 40% WDGS (DM basis) may increase the level and prevalence of E. coli O157:H7 in feedlot cattle, although the magnitude of the difference in this study may have been affected by low prevalence in the control pens.

Last Modified: 8/24/2016
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