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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Little Rock, Arkansas » Arkansas Children's Nutrition Center » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #230796

Title: Phenolic acids in black raspberry and in the gastrointestinal tract of pigs fed black raspberry

Author
item WU, XIANLI
item PITTMAN, HOY
item HAGER, T
item HAGER, A
item HOWARD, LUKE
item Prior, Ronald

Submitted to: Molecular Nutrition and Food Research
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 8/22/2008
Publication Date: 4/15/2009
Citation: Wu, X., Pittman, H.E., Hager, T., Hager, A., Howard, L.R., Prior, R.L. 2009. Phenolic acids in black raspberry and in the gastrointestinal tract of pigs fed black raspberry. Molecular Nutrition and Food Research. 53(1):S76-S84.

Interpretive Summary: Blueberries not only are available fresh, but are available for consumption in several thermally processed forms (jellies, jams, juices, canned, and purees). Processing on blueberry may alter some of the components in the berries that may have health benefits. This study evaluated the effects of processing and 6-month storage on anthocyanins, the color pigments in blueberries, and antioxidant capacity of blueberries that were canned in syrup, canned in water, pureed, and juiced (clarified and non-clarified). Changes following processing were determined after 1 day, 1 months, 3 months, and 6 months of storage. Thermal processing resulted in marked losses in anthocyanins (28-59%) and antioxidant capacity (43-71%) in all products, with the greatest losses occurring in clarified juices, and the least in non-clarified juices. Storage at 25 degrees C for 6 months resulted in dramatic losses in anthocyanins, ranging from 62% in berries canned in water to 85% in clarified juices. Antioxidant capacity showed little change during storage. Methods are needed to retain anthocyanins in thermally processed blueberries.

Technical Abstract: This study evaluated the effects of processing and 6-mo storage on total monomeric anthocyanins, percent polymeric color, and antioxidant capacity of blueberries that were canned in syrup, canned in water, pureed, and juiced (clarified and non-clarified). Total monomeric anthocyanins, percent polymeric color, and ORACFL were determined post-processing after 1 d, 1 mo, 3 mo, and 6 mo of storage. Thermal processing resulted in marked losses in total anthocyanins (28-59%) and ORACFL values (43-71%) in all products, with the greatest losses occurring in clarified juices, and the least in non-clarified juices. Storage at 25 degrees C for 6 mo resulted in dramatic losses in total anthocyanins, ranging from 62% in berries canned in water to 85% in clarified juices. This coincided with marked increases in percent polymeric color values of these products over 6-mo storage. ORACFL values showed little change during storage, indicating that the formation of polymers compensated for the loss of antioxidant capacity due to anthocyanin degradation. Methods are needed to retain anthocyanins in thermally processed blueberries.