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ARS Home » Plains Area » Fargo, North Dakota » Edward T. Schafer Agricultural Research Center » Sugarbeet and Potato Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #149117

Title: REDUCING SUGARBEET LOSSES TO APHANOMYCES ROOT ROT USING BIOLOGICAL CONTROL AND INDUCED RESISTANCE.

Author
item Weiland, John
item Metzger, Michael

Submitted to: Sugarbeet Research and Extension Reports
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: 1/27/2003
Publication Date: 1/31/2003
Citation: WEILAND, J.J., METZGER, M.S. REDUCING SUGARBEET LOSSES TO APHANOMYCES ROOT ROT USING BIOLOGICAL CONTROL AND INDUCED RESISTANCE. SUGARBEET RESEARCH AND EXTENSION REPORT, COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE, NORTH DAKOTA STATE UNIVERSITY. 2003. V. 33 P. 260-272.

Interpretive Summary: Crop protection involves the use of crop management strategies that include the planting of robust varieties and proper plant husbandry. Fungicide use to reduce plant diseases remains a valuable means to protect crops from yield losses. When fungicides are limiting for the control of an important crop disease, additional tools must be investigated for disease control. In the present study, biocontrol bacteria and inducers of plant resistance were tested for the ability to reduce root rot in sugarbeet caused by a fungus. The results indicate that both approaches are worth additional investigation to be used in conjunction with the present chemical control for this disease.

Technical Abstract: Root rot of sugarbeet caused by Aphanomyces cochlioides has resulted in serious losses to growers in Minnesota and North Dakota in recent years. In the present study, inducers of systemic resistance and biocontrol bacteria were use alone and in combination with hymexazole, the sole chemical treatment available for the control of this disease, for evaluating control efficacy. The study, performed at two locations over two seasons, indicates that application strategy of induced resistance is crucial for benefits of this approach to be attained. Application of biocontrol bacteria did not result in a significant improvement of sugarbeet yield, although the trend of higher yield seen in conjunction with the presence of hymexazole was observed. Overall, induced systemic resistance may be a viable means to improve yields in fields where Aphanomyces causes yield reduction.