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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Tucson, Arizona » SWRC » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #104626

Title: ORGANIZING NEW METHODS FOR EROSION AND SEDIMENTATION MONITORING AND CONTROL 1271

Author
item Miller, B.
item Levick, Lainie
item Lane, Leonard
item Steger, R.

Submitted to: International Erosion Control Association Proceedings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: 10/14/1999
Publication Date: N/A
Citation: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Historic and continuing land uses at the U.S. Army's Fort Carson and the Pinon Canyon Maneuver Site (PCMS) may degrade training lands and cause erosion and increased sediment flow into local waters. A team of experts from the US Geological Survey, the USDA Agricultural Research Service's Southwest Watershed Research Center, and two offices of the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service is identifying methods and projects that ca be used by Army land managers to evaluate the Army's potential contribution to the regional sediment pollution problem. Projects include site reclamation to control erosion and sediment transport; monitoring of stream flow, climate, and sediment concentrations; prediction of soil erosion; and assessment of rangeland condition. New research and technology will ensure additional progress in the future, including quantifying the impacts of military land use and training activities and maintaining this information in databases to enable the development of measurement techniques and indicators of ecosystem status, change and damage. Integrated information systems will be used to combine the power of modern databases, simulation modeling, and expert judgment in designing and evaluating erosion control measures.

Technical Abstract: Historic and continuing land uses at the U.S. Army's Fort Carson and the Pinon Canyon Maneuver Site (PCMS) may degrade training lands and cause erosion and increased sediment loading of local waters. A team of experts from the US Geological Survey, the USDA Agricultural Research Service's Southwest Watershed Research Center, and two offices of the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service is identifying methods and projects that ca be used by Army land managers to evaluate the Army's potential contribution to the regional sediment pollution problem. Projects include site reclamation to control erosion and sediment transport; monitoring of stream flow, climate, and sediment concentrations; prediction of soil erosion; and assessment of rangeland condition. New research and technology will ensure additional progress in the future, including quantifying the impacts of military land use and training activities and maintaining this information in databases to enable the development of measurement techniques and indicators of ecosystem status, change and damage. Integrated information systems are required to combine the power of modern databases, simulation modeling, and expert judgment in designing and evaluating erosion control measures in terms of erosion and sediment transport processes.