Skip to main content
ARS Home » Midwest Area » East Lansing, Michigan » Sugarbeet and Bean Research » Research » Research Project #434234

Research Project: Genetic Characterization for Sugar Beet Improvement

Location: Sugarbeet and Bean Research

Project Number: 5050-21220-016-00-D
Project Type: In-House Appropriated

Start Date: Feb 21, 2018
End Date: Feb 20, 2023

Objective:
Objective 1: Annotate, prospect, and identify genes and genome structure of the ARS release C869 (a.k.a. EL10) reference sugar beet genome, and develop linkage maps aimed at chromosome-level genome assembly for genes of agronomic importance and interest that breeders can use. Sub-objective 1.A: Annotate, prospect, and identify genes and genome structure of the EL10 genome. Sub-objective 1.B: Develop linkage maps aimed at chromosome-level genome assembly for genes of agronomic importance and interest that breeders can use. Objective 2: Assess the host range, diversity, and host-pathogen interactions of sugar beet pathogens of high priority to the Great Lakes, including Rhizoctonia, Cercospora, and seedling disease complex, to identify host resistance factors for use in breeding programs. Objective 3: Identify sugar beet-specific genes and develop genetic markers involved in beet quality and crop type (sugar, fodder, table, or chard) to transfer novel genetic resources from un-adapted to adapted germplasm, for the benefit of all beet crop types.

Approach:
1) Explore disease resistance and stress-germination genes in EL10 and related germplasm. Phenotype RIL populations and obtain low-coverage re-sequencing for genetic analysis and mapping. Develop additional genetic populations and enhanced germplasm for release. 2) Develop and utilize genetic markers and other genetic information for enhanced understanding of Rhizoctonia solani and other plant pathogenic fungi. Characterize host-pathogen, host-pathogen-pathogen interactions and host developmental stages that influence disease progression. 3) Evaluate crop genomes for markers and other features important in a breeding context. Evaluate non-beet genomes for features of potential benefit to long-term beet improvement.