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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Fort Pierce, Florida » U.S. Horticultural Research Laboratory » Subtropical Insects and Horticulture Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #411984

Research Project: IPM Method for Control of Insect Pests and Transmitted Diseases of Orchard Crops

Location: Subtropical Insects and Horticulture Research

Title: Complete genome sequences of StopSmel and Aussie, two Mu-like bacteriophages of Sinorhizobium meliloti

Author
item NIELANDER, MACY - Florida Institute Of Technology
item MAYBANK, MYA - Indian River State College
item MASSIMINO, CRISSY - University Of Edinburgh
item FITZGERALD, HANNAH - Indian River State College
item BLOSSUM, HANNAH - Indian River State College
item DOUTHITT, CAYCE - Indian River State College
item HOLLAND, CHRISTOPHER - Indian River State College
item Hunter, Wayne
item CARROL, MEGAN - Indian River State College
item D'ELIA, TOM - Indian River State College

Submitted to: Microbiology Resource Announcements
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 2/7/2024
Publication Date: 2/22/2024
Citation: Nielander, M., Maybank, M., Massimino, C., Fitzgerald, H., Blossum, H., Douthitt, C., Holland, C., Hunter, W.B., Carrol, M., D'Elia, T. 2024. Complete genome sequences of StopSmel and Aussie, two Mu-like bacteriophages of Sinorhizobium meliloti. Microbiology Resource Announcements. 22:e0123023. https://doi.org/10.1128/mra.01230-23.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1128/mra.01230-23

Interpretive Summary: Researchers report on the discovery of two bacteria-infecting viruses called bacteriophage, that can be developed into potential biocontrol agents to control pathogenic bacteria of agriculture crops, like Candidatus Liberibacter bacteria infecting citrus causing Huanglongbing. Genome sequencing of the two bacteriophages, Aussie and StopSmel, which were isolated from soil enabled comparative analysis and identified core gene functions. These two phage viruses add to the growing list of potential biocontrol agents that can be used to control pathogenic bacteria.

Technical Abstract: Researchers report the discovery and genome sequencing of two bacteriophages, Aussie and StopSmel, isolated from soil in Florida, using a Gram-negative rhizosphere bacterium host, Sinorhizobium meliloti, strain (NRRL L-50). The genomes are similar in length, and gene content, sharing 76% nucleotide identity. A total of 53 genes were predicted in Aussie, with 22 assigned protein functions, with identification of 52 genes in StopSmel, of which 21 were assigned function. Genes encoding the transcriptional regulators Mor and C were also present in both genomes, along with late genes related to structural phage proteins and lysis. Bacteriophage can be used as biocontrol agents against agriculturally important pathogenic bacteria, like Candidatus Liberibacter associated with Huanglongbing in citrus. These two new phages add to the growing list of potential biological agents aimed at managing pathogenic bacteria in agriculture.