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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Burns, Oregon » Range and Meadow Forage Management Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #409365

Research Project: Restoration and Conservation of Great Basin Ecosystems

Location: Range and Meadow Forage Management Research

Title: Establishing a precision restoration approach using seed enhancement technologies

Author
item Svejcar, Lauren
item Davies, Kirk

Submitted to: Society for Range Management Meeting Abstracts
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 12/28/2023
Publication Date: N/A
Citation: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Globally, rangeland ecosystems are challenged with increasing levels of degradation. One of the major drivers of ecosystem degradation around the world is invasion of exotic species. An example of this is the sagebrush steppe which is challenged with exotic annual grasses progressively dominating land and altering historic fire cycles. However, restoration efforts in degraded sagebrush steppe areas have highly variable success, with anywhere from 0-30% establishment of seeded species. Variance in seedling establishment, in particular through seed-based restoration efforts, is largely driven by spatiotemporal variation in both abiotic and biotic seedling establishment barriers. For example, high variability in interannual patterns of precipitation pose a major challenge to restoration success. Understanding the impacts of spatial and temporal variability of establishment barriers at the seed germination to seedling establishment phase can help us identify ways to maximize restoration efforts. Such information can be used to then inform precision restoration planning efforts.

Technical Abstract: Globally, rangeland ecosystems are challenged with increasing levels of degradation. One of the major drivers of ecosystem degradation around the world is invasion of exotic species. An example of this is the sagebrush steppe which is challenged with exotic annual grasses progressively dominating land and altering historic fire cycles. However, restoration efforts in degraded sagebrush steppe areas have highly variable success, with anywhere from 0-30% establishment of seeded species. Variance in seedling establishment, in particular through seed-based restoration efforts, is largely driven by spatiotemporal variation in both abiotic and biotic seedling establishment barriers. For example, high variability in interannual patterns of precipitation pose a major challenge to restoration success. Understanding the impacts of spatial and temporal variability of establishment barriers at the seed germination to seedling establishment phase can help us identify ways to maximize restoration efforts. Such information can be used to then inform precision restoration planning efforts.