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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Fort Pierce, Florida » U.S. Horticultural Research Laboratory » Subtropical Insects and Horticulture Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #404854

Research Project: IPM Method for Control of Insect Pests and Transmitted Diseases of Orchard Crops

Location: Subtropical Insects and Horticulture Research

Title: The genome of the invasive and broadly polyphagous Diaprepes root weevil, Diaprepes abbreviatus (Coleoptera), reveals an arsenal of putative polysaccharide-degrading enzymes

Author
item SYLVESTER, TERRENCE - University Of Memphis
item ADAMS, RICHARD - University Of Memphis
item Hunter, Wayne
item LI, XUANKUN - University Of Memphis
item RIVERA-MARCHAND, BERT - Universidad Interamericana De Puerto Rico
item SHEN, RONGRONG - University Of Memphis
item MCKENNA, DUANE - University Of Memphis

Submitted to: Journal of Heredity
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 10/25/2023
Publication Date: 10/25/2023
Citation: Sylvester, T., Adams, R., Hunter, W.B., Li, X., Rivera-Marchand, B., Shen, R., Mckenna, D.D. 2023. Genome of the citrus root weevil, Diaprepes abbreviatus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) reveals new insights into the evolution of beetle sex chromosomes, specialized plant-feeding and invasiveness. Journal of Heredity, 2023;, esad064 https://doi.org/10.1093/jhered/esad064.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1093/jhered/esad064

Interpretive Summary: The citrus root weevil, Diaprepes abbreviatus, L., (Diaprepes root weevil, DRW) is a beetle with a broad host plant range of over 270 plant species and is a major agricultural pest on citrus in both its native Caribbean range and in the United States, where it is an invasive species. The weevil genome was 1.69 Gigabases after assembly. Genome annotation identified 18,412 genes. Notably, the identification of 249 Plant Cell Wall Degrading Enzymes (PCWDE) that facilitate the metabolism of ingested woody plant tissues and the detoxification of plant chemicals. The genome provides critical information on the enzymes weevils use to successfully feed on plant foliage and roots. These specific genes can be used to produce better control strategies against weevil pests.

Technical Abstract: The citrus root weevil, Diaprepes abbreviatus, L., (aka. Diaprepes root weevil, DRW) (Coleoptera: Cuculionidae) is a major agricultural pest on citrus in both its native Caribbean range and in the United States, where it is an invasive species. The DRW has a broad range of host plants, including over 270 species in 59 families. It belongs to the species-rich beetle clade Phytophaga, whose genomes encode Plant Cell Wall Degrading Enzymes (PCWDE) that facilitate the metabolism of woody plant tissues and the detoxification of plant allelochemicals. The weevil genome provides critical information on weevil enzymes used to feed on plants that can be used to develop better pest control strategies. The genome was 1.69 Gigabases after assembly, with 653 contigs, and an N50 of 7.8 Megabases, the largest contig was 62 Megabases. Most of the genome was comprised of repetitive sequences, with 66.17% in transposable elements, 5.75 % in macrosatellites, and 2.06% in microsatellites. 99.5% of the expected orthologous genes present and fully assembled, with 1.5% duplicated, and the remaining 0.5% missing. We identified 53 contigs as fragments of the putative X and Y sex chromosomes. Genome annotation identified 18,412 genes with functional domains. Notably, identification of 249 putative PCWDE genes, of which 239 had a glycoside hydrolase (GH) function assigned, this is the greatest number of GH genes known for all insect genomes to date. Thus, the GH gene count may be a useful indicator of weevil host plant range and be linked to weevil pest invasive potential.