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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Mayaguez, Puerto Rico » Tropical Crops and Germplasm Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #403962

Research Project: Genetic Improvement of Stress Tolerance in Common Bean through Genetic Diversity and Accelerated Phenotyping

Location: Tropical Crops and Germplasm Research

Title: Genetic variation in a tepary bean (Phaseolus Acutifolius A. Gray) diversity panel reveals loci associated with biotic stress resistance

Author
item BORNOWSKI, NOLAN - Michigan State University
item HART, JOHN - Earthwork Seeds Inc
item VARGAS PALACIOS, ANA - University Of Saskatchewan
item OGG, BARRY - Colorado State University
item BRICK, MARK - Colorado State University
item BEAVER, JAMES - University Of Puerto Rico
item HAMILTON, JOHN - University Of Georgia
item BUELL, ROBIN - University Of Georgia
item Porch, Timothy - Tim

Submitted to: The Plant Genome
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 5/26/2023
Publication Date: N/A
Citation: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Tepary bean, indigenous to the arid climates of northern Mexico, diverged from common bean approximately 2 million years ago and exhibits a wide range of resistance to biotic stressors in addition to being more well-adapted to higher temperatures that are increasingly likely due to climate change. The tepary genome is highly syntenic to the common bean genome providing a foundation for discovery and breeding of agronomic traits between these two crop species. To date, a limited number of adaptive traits from tepary bean have been introgressed into common bean lines due to the hybridization barriers between these two species. To fully utilize tepary bean germplasm as a donor of adaptive traits, development of modern breeding resources and germplasm characterization is required. In this study, a diversity panel of 423 cultivated, weedy, and wild tepary bean accessions were genotyped and phenotyped revealing eight subpopulations and differentiation of subspecies. A genome-wide association study was performed with the 423-member diversity panel that illuminated loci and candidate genes underlying biotic stress resistance that can be harnessed not only for tepary bean but also common bean improvement.

Technical Abstract: Tepary bean (Phaseolus acutifolius A. Gray), indigenous to the arid climates of northern Mexico, diverged from common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) approximately 2 million years ago and exhibits a wide range of resistance to biotic stressors in addition to being more well-adapted to higher temperatures that are increasingly likely due to climate change. The tepary genome is highly syntenic to the common bean genome providing a foundation for discovery and breeding of agronomic traits between these two crop species. To date, a limited number of adaptive traits from tepary bean have been introgressed into common bean lines due to the hybridization barriers between these two species. To fully utilize tepary bean germplasm as a donor of adaptive traits, development of modern breeding resources and germplasm characterization is required. In this study, a diversity panel of 423 cultivated, weedy, and wild tepary bean accessions were genotyped and phenotyped revealing eight subpopulations and differentiation of subspecies. A genome-wide association study was performed with the 423-member diversity panel that illuminated loci and candidate genes underlying biotic stress resistance that can be harnessed not only for tepary bean but also common bean improvement.