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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Newark, Delaware » Beneficial Insects Introduction Research Unit » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #401429

Research Project: Biological Control and Associated Technologies for Managing Invasive Wood-Boring and other Forest Insect Pests such as Emerald Ash Borer, Asian Longhorned Beetle and Spotted Lanternfly

Location: Beneficial Insects Introduction Research Unit

Title: Exploration for native parasitoids of Asian longhorned beetle in China as prospective biological control agents

Author
item WEI, KE - Chinese Academy Of Forestry
item LI, FEI - Chinese Academy Of Forestry
item TANG, YAN-LONG - Chinese Academy Of Forestry
item CAO, LIANG-MING - Chinese Academy Of Forestry
item YANG, ZHONG-QI - Chinese Academy Of Forestry
item GOULD, JULI - Animal And Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS)
item WANG, XIAO-YI - Chinese Academy Of Forestry
item Wang, Xingeng

Submitted to: Agricultural and Forest Entomology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 5/24/2023
Publication Date: 6/1/2023
Citation: Wei, K., Li, F., Tang, Y., Cao, L., Yang, Z., Gould, J.R., Wang, X., Wang, X. 2023. Exploration for native parasitoids of Asian longhorned beetle in China as prospective biological control agents. Agricultural and Forest Entomology. https://doi.org/10.1111/afe.12583.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/afe.12583

Interpretive Summary: Asian longhorned beetle (ALB) is a high-risk invasive pest, attacking various healthy hardwood trees. To explore the potential of biological control of this pest in the U.S., we conducted surveys of ALB natural enemies using sentinel logs infested with ALB eggs and young larvae in five geographical regions (Beijing, Gansu, Guizhou, Shanghai, and Yunnan) in China from 2019 to 2022. Seven parasitic wasp species were discovered during the surveys. Among them, two species were relatively dominant and were collected consistently throughout the surveyed seasons and years in the different regions and may be considered as prospective agents for biological control introduction against ALB in the U.S.

Technical Abstract: Native to China and the Korean Peninsula, the Asian longhorned beetle (ALB) Anoplophora glabripennis (Motschulsky) (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) is a high-risk invasive pest capable of attacking various healthy hardwood trees. To explore the potential of biological control of this pest in the U.S., we conducted surveys of ALB parasitoids using sentinel logs infested with ALB eggs and young larvae in five geographical regions (Beijing, Gansu, Guizhou, Shanghai, and Yunnan) in China from 2019 to 2022. Seven hymenopteran larval parasitoid species, Bracon planitibiae Yang, Eurytoma chinensis Yang, Heydenia sp., Oxysychus glabripennis Yang, Sclerodermus guani Hope, Spathius anoplophorae Yang, and Zolotarewskya anoplophorae Yang, were collected in Beijing. Four, three and two of these species were also found in Shanghai, Guizhou, and Yunnan, respectively. No parasitoid was found in Gansu. Mean parasitism by all parasitoid species varied by geography, season, and year; averaging (range) 3.6 – 15.8% (0 – 31.2%) in Beijing, 1.4 –16.4% (0 – 37.7%) in Guizhou, 1.6 – 7.1% (0 – 21.0%) in Shanghai, and 5.8% (0–8.3%) in Yunnan. Parasitism peaked in early summer in Beijing and Shanghai and in late summer in Guizhou. Spathius anoplophorae and O. glabripennis were the two most dominant parasitoids collected consistently throughout the surveyed seasons and years in the four different regions and may be considered as prospective agents for biological control introduction against ALB in the U.S. Overall, there is a lack of egg parasitoids. We discuss some underlying ecological mechanisms that might contribute to the rarity of egg parasitoids and future opportunities and challenges for biological control of ALB.