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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Albany, California » Western Regional Research Center » Foodborne Toxin Detection and Prevention Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #390658

Research Project: Novel Methods for the Mitigation of Human Pathogens and Mycotoxin Contamination of High Value California Specialty Crops

Location: Foodborne Toxin Detection and Prevention Research

Title: Redox-active molecules as antimicrobials: Mechanisms and resistance

Author
item GRUHLKE, MARTIN - Aachen University
item Kim, Jong Heon
item CHENG, LUISA - Former ARS Employee
item LAND, KIRKWOOD - University Of The Pacific

Submitted to: Frontiers in Microbiology
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: 9/22/2021
Publication Date: 11/15/2021
Citation: Gruhlke, M.C., Kim, J., Cheng, L.W., Land, K.M. 2021. Redox-active molecules as antimicrobials: Mechanisms and resistance. Frontiers in Microbiology. pp. 1-70.Available: https://doi.org/10.3389/978-2-88971-637-1.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3389/978-2-88971-637-1

Interpretive Summary: Current drugs for treating microbial infections have limited efficiency, especially for eliminating drug resistant pathogens. Although high-throughput screenings have been investigated for identifying novel antimicrobial drug candidates, stagnation in development of new, safe antimicrobial agents is a persistent public health concern. Recent investigations have determined that the antimicrobial mechanisms of certain drugs involve oxidative stress/damage in pathogens, and therefore, those drugs are further defined as oxidative stress drugs. In this eBook, seven works (four original research articles, one review, one hypothesis and theory and one editorial) were published on the use of redox-active molecules as antimicrobials, providing oxidative mechanisms and resistance management tools.

Technical Abstract: Current antimicrobial drugs have limited efficacy in treating microbial infections, particularly those caused by drug resistant pathogens. Immuno-compromised groups of patients are especially at risk of developing infectious diseases. While high-throughput screenings have been investigated for identifying novel antimicrobial drugs, a stagnation in development of new, safe and effective agents is a persistent public health concern. This eBook focuses on studies that investigate and discuss: 1) The isolation or synthesis of redox molecules for antimicrobial treatments, 2) The role of redox-active natural products, such as sulfur-containing compounds, as defense molecules against a wide range of microbial pathogens, 3) The mechanisms of antimicrobial action of redox molecules identified, including that for overcoming drug resistance, 4) Experimental systems and approaches in antimicrobial research using redox molecules, and 5) The potential for negative side-effects associated with the application of redox molecules to the environment or the patient.