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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Leetown, West Virginia » Cool and Cold Water Aquaculture Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #378724

Research Project: Support the Viability and Expansion of Land-Based Closed-Containment Aquaculture

Location: Cool and Cold Water Aquaculture Research

Title: Assessing the toxicity of peracetic acid to early Atlantic salmon Salmo salar life-stages

Author
item REDMEN, NATALIE - FRESHWATER INSTITUTE
item Straus, David - Dave
item ANNIS, ERIC - HOOD COLLEGE
item MURRAY, MEGAN - FRESHWATER INSTITUTE
item GOOD, CHRISTOPHER - FRESHWATER INSTITUTE

Submitted to: Aquaculture Research
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 6/29/2022
Publication Date: 7/7/2022
Citation: Redmen, N., Straus, D.L., Annis, E.R., Murray, M., Good, C. 2022. Assessing the toxicity of peracetic acid to early Atlantic salmon Salmo salar life-stages. Aquaculture Research. (53)14:5097-5104. https://doi.org/10.1111/are.15997.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/are.15997

Interpretive Summary: Peracetic acid has significant potential for use as a disinfectant in aquaculture. Baseline research, however, including its toxicity to important species such as Atlantic salmon, is necessary. The 24-hour LC50 value (the concentration at which approximately 50% mortality occurs after 24 hours) of peracetic acid was determined for three early life-stages of Atlantic salmon in this study: eyed eggs, fry, and fingerlings. The LC50 values determined from this study provide guidance for developing safe peracetic acid treatment protocols for early Atlantic salmon life-stages.

Technical Abstract: Bacterial and fungal pathogens in recirculating aquaculture systems and egg incubation systems can cause elevated mortality and decreased production. Peracetic acid (PAA) is a relatively low-cost, safe, and effective disinfectant; however, its toxicity to early life stages of the Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) has yet to be assessed. The 24-hour LC50 value (the concentration at which approximately 50% mortality occurs after 24 hours) of PAA was determined for three early life stages of Atlantic salmon: eyed eggs, fry (approximately 0.16 – 0.18 g mean weight), and fingerlings (16.3 g). LC50 values were calculated using both the Trimmed Spearman-Karber (TSK) method and the Toxicity Relationship Analysis Program (TRAP). TRAP 24-hour LC50 values for the eyed eggs treated for 5 and 10 minutes were 781.5 mg/L PAA and 485.0 mg/L PAA, respectively, while TSK 24-hour LC50 values for the eyed eggs treated for 5 and 10 minutes were 771.1 mg/L PAA and 462.1 mg/L PAA, respectively. TRAP 24-hour LC50 values for the fry and fingerlings were 4.0 mg/L PAA and 5.3 mg/L PAA, respectively, while TSK 24-hour LC50 values for the fry and fingerling were 4.1 mg/L PAA and 5.3 mg/L PAA, respectively. These 24-hour LC50 values provide guidance for developing safe treatment protocols eggs, fry, and/or fingerlings with PAA.