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Research Project: Biological Control of Invasive Wood-Boring Insect Pests such as Emerald Ash Borer and Asian Longhorned Beetle

Location: Beneficial Insects Introduction Research Unit

Title: Biological control of Drosophila suzukii

Author
item Wang, Xingeng
item Lee, Jana
item DAANE, KENT - University Of California
item Buffington, Matthew
item Hoelmer, Kim

Submitted to: CAB Reviews: Perspectives in Agriculture, Veterinary Science, Nutrition and Natural Resources
Publication Type: Review Article
Publication Acceptance Date: 10/26/2020
Publication Date: 12/11/2020
Citation: Wang, X., Lee, J.C., Daane, K.M., Buffington, M.L., Hoelmer, K.A. 2020. Biological control of Drosophila suzukii. CAB Reviews: Perspectives in Agriculture, Veterinary Science, Nutrition and Natural Resources. 15: 054. https://doi.org/10.1079/PAVSNNR202015054.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1079/PAVSNNR202015054

Interpretive Summary: Spotted-wing drosophila (SWD) is native to East Asia but has widely established in the Americas and Europe, becoming a devastating pest of soft-skinned fruits in its invaded regions. Following its global invasion, widespread efforts have been made to discover and evaluate SWD natural enemies and to develop biological control tactics for this serious pest. Over 100 studies have been conducted in the Americas, Asia and Europe on SWD natural enemies. This review provides an up-to-date list of known natural enemies, summarizes current research progress and challenges, proposes optimal use of various biological control tools, and discusses future research directions. We hope this review will provide a roadmap to foster the use of biological control tools in more sustainable management programs for this invasive pest.

Technical Abstract: Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura) is native to East Asia but has widely established in the Americas and Europe, where it is a devastating pest of soft-skinned fruits. It has a wide host range and these non-crop habitats harbor the fly which then repeatedly reinvade crop fields. Biological control in non-crop habitats could be the cornerstone for sustainable management at the landscape level. Towards this goal, researchers have developed or investigated biological control tactics. We review over 100 studies, conducted in the Americas, Asia and Europe on natural enemies of D. suzukii. Two previous reviews provided an overview of potential natural enemies and detailed accounts on foreign explorations. Here, we provide an up-to-date list of known or evaluated parasitoids, predators and entomopathogens (pathogenic fungi, bacteria, nematodes and virus) and summarize research progress to date. We emphasize a systematic approach towards the development of biological control strategies that can stand alone or be combined with more conventional control tools. Finally, we propose a framework for the integrated use of biological control tools, from classical biological control with host-specific Asian parasitoids, to augmentative and conservation biological control with indigenous natural enemies, to the use of entomopathogens. This review provides a roadmap to foster the use of biological control tools in more sustainable D. suzukii control programs.