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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Boise, Idaho » Watershed Management Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #374186

Research Project: Assessment and Mitigation of Disturbed Sagebrush-Steppe Ecosystems

Location: Watershed Management Research

Title: Shared monitoring, share stewardship

Author
item Kachergis, Emily
item McCord, Sarah
item Bestelmeyer, Brandon
item Clark, Pat
item DYER, KATHRYN - Bureau Of Land Management
item GRANT, TOM - Northern Colorado Water Conservancy District
item JOHNSON, ANDREW - Bureau Of Land Management
item HALE, STEVEN - Utah Gas Corp
item WAHLERT, JEFF - Crow Valley Livestock Cooperative
item SHULZ, TERRI - The Nature Conservancy
item ADDY, CASEY - Bureau Of Land Management
item NAUMAN, TRAVIS - Us Geological Survey (USGS)

Submitted to: Society for Range Management Meeting Abstracts
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 8/17/2019
Publication Date: N/A
Citation: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Standardized monitoring information is transforming land stewardship by creating a common language for translating diverse ideas about land conditions and changes but, when collection and analysis of this information occurs in partnership, outcomes are often further improved for both the lands and communities involved. This Ignite presentation session will showcase partnerships that are using core indicator information to achieve shared land management goals. Examples will span the variety of land uses in the Western US, including livestock grazing, land treatment effectiveness, wildlife habitat management, and energy development and reclamation. Together, these examples will demonstrate the hallmarks of successful monitoring partnerships which can and will have broad impact resource management applications and communities.

Technical Abstract: Standardized monitoring information is transforming land stewardship by creating a common language for translating diverse ideas about land conditions and changes. Core monitoring indicators and methodologies adopted by BLM, NRCS, and other groups provide comparable information that can be readily understood by stakeholders. When collection and analysis of this information occurs in partnership, outcomes are often improved for both the lands and communities involved. This session will showcase partnerships that are using core indicator information to achieve shared land management goals. Examples will span the variety of land uses in the Western US, including livestock grazing, land treatment effectiveness, wildlife habitat management, and energy development and reclamation. Together, these examples will demonstrate the hallmarks of successful monitoring partnerships which can be extended into new communities and resource management applications.