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ARS Home » Plains Area » Bushland, Texas » Conservation and Production Research Laboratory » Livestock Nutrient Management Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #374155

Research Project: Improved Practices to Conserve Air Quality, Maintain Animal Productivity, and Enhance Use of Manure and Soil Nutrients of Cattle Production Systems for the Southern Great Plains

Location: Livestock Nutrient Management Research

Title: Emissions from swine manure treated with current products for mitigation of odors and reduction of NH3, H2S, VOC, and GHG emissions

Author
item CHEN, B - Iowa State University
item KOZIEL, J - Iowa State University
item BANIK, C - Iowa State University
item MA, H - Iowa State University
item LEE, M - Chungnam National University
item WI, J - Chungnam National University
item MEIIRKHANULY, Z - Iowa State University
item ANDERSON, D - Iowa State University
item BIALOWIEC, A - Wroclaw Medical University
item Parker, David

Submitted to: Data
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 6/13/2020
Publication Date: 6/18/2020
Citation: Chen, B., Koziel, J.A., Banik, C., Ma, H., Lee, M., Wi, J., Meiirkhanuly, Z., Anderson, D.S., Bialowiec, A., Parker, D.B. 2020. Emissions from swine manure treated with current products for mitigation of odors and reduction of NH3, H2S, VOC, and GHG emissions. Data. 5(2):54. https://doi.org/10.3390/data5020054.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3390/data5020054

Interpretive Summary: Odor and gaseous emissions from swine farms can pose a nuisance to nearby communities. While many commercial products are marketed for reducing emissions from swine manure, many of these products have not been scientifically evaluated for their effectiveness. Scientists from USDA-ARS (Bushland, Texas), Iowa State University, Chungnam National University (South Korea) and Wroclaw University (Poland) evaluated 12 manure additive products for their effectiveness in mitigating odor and gaseous emissions from swine manure. The pilot-scale system simulated the storage of swine manure with controlled ventilation of headspace and periodic addition of manure. Manure was collected from three swine farms in central Iowa. A large dataset was compiled that contained measured concentrations of ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide), volatile organic compounds, and odor. This dataset will be used by swine farmers, the regulatory community, and the public for evaluating the effectiveness of these commercial products.

Technical Abstract: Odor and gaseous emissions from the swine industry are of concern for the well-being of humans and livestock. Additives applied to the swine manure surface are popular, marketed products to solve this problem as relatively inexpensive and easy for farmers to use. There is no scientific data evaluating the effectiveness of many of these products. We evaluated 12 manure additive products that are currently being marketed on their effectiveness in mitigating odor and gaseous emissions from swine manure. We used a pilot-scale system simulating storage of swine manure with controlled ventilation of headspace and periodic addition of manure. This dataset contains measured concentrations and estimated emissions of target gases in manure headspace above treated and untreated swine manure. These include ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, greenhouse gases (GHG; carbon dioxide, CO2; methane, CH4; and nitrous oxide, N2O), volatile organic compounds (VOC), and odor. The experiment to test each manure additive product lasted for 2 months; the measurements of NH3 and H2S were completed twice a week; others were conducted weekly. Manure for each test was collected from 3 different farms in central Iowa to provide the necessary variety in stored swine manure properties. This dataset is useful for further analyses of gaseous emissions from swine manure under simulated storage conditions and for performance comparison of marketed products for the mitigation of gaseous emissions. Ultimately, swine farmers, the regulatory community, and the public need to have scientific data informing decisions about the usefulness of manure additives.