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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Kearneysville, West Virginia » Appalachian Fruit Research Laboratory » Innovative Fruit Production, Improvement, and Protection » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #370944

Research Project: Integrated Orchard Management and Automation for Deciduous Tree Fruit Crops (BRIDGE PROJECT)

Location: Innovative Fruit Production, Improvement, and Protection

Title: Comparison and refinement of integrated pest management tactics for Halyomorpha halys (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) management in apple orchards

Author
item Leskey, Tracy
item SHORT, BRENT - Trece, Inc
item Ludwick, Dalton

Submitted to: Journal of Economic Entomology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 3/18/2020
Publication Date: 5/5/2020
Citation: Leskey, T.C., Short, B.D., Ludwick, D.C. 2020. Comparison and refinement of integrated pest management tactics for Halyomorpha halys (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) management in apple orchards. Journal of Economic Entomology. https://doi.org/10.1093/jee/toaa067.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1093/jee/toaa067

Interpretive Summary: The brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB) is an invasive species that can cause serious injury to tree fruit. Principally, this pest has been managed through the use of repeated broad-spectrum insecticide applications which can result in increased costs and secondary pest outbreaks. To reduce the amount of insecticides being applied against this invasive species, we compared various integrated pest management (IPM) tactics including border sprays and baited attract-and-kill border row trees treated every seven and 14 days in apple orchards. These treatments were compared with a trap-based treatment threshold for initiating insecticide sprays and apple orchard blocks that were not treated with insecticides for BMSB. While all IPM tactics reduced insecticide inputs and stink bug injury, the trap-based treatment threshold required the least inputs and labor overall, making it a good fit for many apple growers.

Technical Abstract: Halyomorpha halys (Stål) (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) has been managed primarily through the use of broad-spectrum insecticides in orchard systems. Recently, perimeter-based integrated pest management (IPM) techniques have been employed against H. halys to reduce insecticide inputs and take advantage of its perimeter-driven behavior. However, no study has compared these strategies to one another and in comparison with an established trap-based treatment threshold for triggering insecticide applications. In 2015 and 2016, we compared trap-based threshold-triggered spray applications, perimeter-based attract-and-kill trees treated every seven and 14 days, and perimeter spray applications applied every seven and 14 days with an untreated control. Additionally, all plots were monitored with two black pyramid traps baited with the H. halys pheromone and pheromone synergist deployed in plot interiors. In both years, the mean number of H. halys captured in untreated control plot traps was significantly greater than plots managed using IPM tactics. In 2015, significantly more insecticide applications were made in a seven- and 14-day perimeter and attract-and-kill plots compared with trap-based threshold plots. There was no significant difference in the percentage of injured fruit in plot interiors among IPM tactics, but all were significantly lower than the control. In 2016, significantly more insecticide applications were made in a seven-day perimeter spray and attract-and-kill plots compared with all other treatments. Significantly less injury was detected in plot interiors for a seven- and 14-day perimeter and trap-based threshold plots compared with the control, and seven- and 14-day attract-and-kill. Although all IPM tactics reduced H. halys injury in apples compared with control plots, those managed using a trap-based treatment threshold only required insecticide inputs and labor during brief periods of the season, while all others required season-long maintenance.