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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Mayaguez, Puerto Rico » Tropical Crops and Germplasm Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #367134

Research Project: Genetic Improvement of Stress Tolerance in Common Bean through Genetic Diversity and Accelerated Phenotyping

Location: Tropical Crops and Germplasm Research

Title: Release of TARS-LH1 a pinto bean germplasm with resistance to the leafhopper pest

Author
item Porch, Timothy - Tim
item BRISCO-MCCANN, ELIZABETH - Michigan State University
item DEMOSTHENE, GASNER - Ministry Of Agriculture-Haiti
item COLBERT, RAPHAEL - Zamorano, Panamerican School Of Agriculture
item BEAVER, JAMES - University Of Puerto Rico
item KELLY, JAMES - Michigan State University

Submitted to: Journal of Plant Registrations
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 10/3/2020
Publication Date: 3/5/2020
Citation: Porch, T.G., Brisco-Mccann, E.I., Demosthene, G., Colbert, R.W., Beaver, J.S., Kelly, J.D. 2020. Release of TARS-LH1 a pinto bean germplasm with resistance to the leafhopper pest. Journal of Plant Registrations. https://doi.org/10.1002/plr2.20021.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1002/plr2.20021

Interpretive Summary: Leafhoppers cause significant yield reductions in common bean and are a particularly important constraint for organic producers. Genetic resistance would benefit both conventional and organic dry and snap bean production threatened by leafhopper damage since the use of pesticides could be reduced or eliminated. The improvement of the leafhopper species E. kraemeri resistance in tropical germplasm has been successful, but resistance to the leafhopper species E. fabae in temperate germplasm has not been broadly pursued. TARS-LH1 is a pinto bean germplasm resistant to both leafhopper species, adapted to both temperate and tropical growing environments and developed through the introgression of leafhopper resistance from the Mesoamerican common bean race into the Durango common bean race. TARS-LH1 also possesses drought tolerance and resistance to Bean common mosaic virus, near commercial pinto bean seed type, and seed yields greater than parental cultivars under leafhopper pressure. This germplasm was developed cooperatively by the USDA-ARS, Michigan State University, the Ministry of Agriculture of Haiti, and the University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez and will be useful for the improvement of cultivars for leafhopper resistance or for use by farmers for pinto bean production.

Technical Abstract: Leafhoppers (Empoasca spp.) cause significant yield reductions in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and are a particularly important constraint for organic producers. Genetic resistance would benefit both conventional and organic dry and snap bean production threatened by leafhopper damage. The improvement of E. kraemeri leafhopper resistance in tropical germplasm has been successful, but resistance to E. fabae in temperate germplasm has not been broadly pursued. TARS-LH1 (Reg. No. GP-____, PI 691505) is a pinto bean germplasm resistant to E. fabae and E. kraemeri, adapted to both temperate and tropical growing environments and developed through the introgression of leafhopper resistance from the Mesoamerican common bean race into the Durango common bean race. TARS-LH1 also possesses drought tolerance and the I gene for resistance to Bean common mosaic virus, near commercial pinto bean seed type, and has produced seed yields greater than parental cultivars under leafhopper pressure. This germplasm was developed cooperatively by the USDA-ARS, Michigan State University, the Ministry of Agriculture of Haiti, and the University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez.