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ARS Home » Plains Area » Bushland, Texas » Conservation and Production Research Laboratory » Livestock Nutrient Management Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #365102

Research Project: Improved Practices to Conserve Air Quality, Maintain Animal Productivity, and Enhance Use of Manure and Soil Nutrients of Cattle Production Systems for the Southern Great Plains

Location: Livestock Nutrient Management Research

Title: Peanut skin in diet alters average daily gain, ruminal and blood metabolites, and carcass traits associated with Haemonchus contortus infection in meat goats

Author
item Min, Byeng
item ABRAHAMSEN, FRANK - Tuskegee University
item GURUNG, NAR - Tuskegee University
item LEE, JUNG - Fort Valley State University
item JOO, JONG - Joongbu University
item PACHESO, WILMER - Auburn University

Submitted to: Animal Nutrition
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 5/27/2019
Publication Date: 6/24/2019
Citation: Min, B., Abrahamsen, F., Gurung, N., Lee, J.H., Joo, J.W., Pacheso, W. 2019. Peanut skin in diet alters average daily gain, ruminal and blood metabolites, and carcass traits associated with Haemonchus contortus infection in meat goats. Animal Nutrition. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.aninu.2019.05.006.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.aninu.2019.05.006

Interpretive Summary: Goats for meat production are susceptible to parasitic internal worm infections. One approach to reduce the occurrence of such infections is feeding of tannin-rich ingredients, like peanut skin (PS). However, optimum levels of tannin-rich PS feeding programs for meat goats and their potential anthelmintic effects are not well established. The objectives of this experiment were to determine the effects of PS supplementation on dry matter intake (DMI), average daily gain (ADG), rumen and blood plasma metabolites, carcass traits, and parasites in goats housed indoors. Results by scientists from USDA-ARS (Bushland, TX), Tuskegee University (Tuskegee, AL), Auburn University (Auburn, AL), and JoongBu University (S. Korea) demonstrated that supplementation of goats with PS has the potential to increase average daily gain and reduce the burden of gastrointestinal parasites. Present results indicate that the optimum level of PS supplementation ranges from 15 to 30% peanut skin (as-fed basis) or condensed tannins levels of 2.4 to 4.9% dry matter in the diet. These results are of interest to goat producers, especially those in the Southeast US where occurrence of internal parasites can be high.

Technical Abstract: Optimum levels of tannin-rich peanut skin (PS) feeding programs for meat goats and their potential anthelmintic effects are not well established. Because of high levels of tannins in PS, the proteins are poorly digestion and its feeding value is low despite high fat content, which limits its inclusion level in cattle rations. Unlikely cattle, goats (browser) have shown to be adapted handling moderate to high levels of tannins in their diet. Because goats are capable of handling higher levels of condensed tannins (CT) in their diets, PS could have the potential to be used in goat feeds. However, data concerning the effects of different levels of PS supplementation on rumen fermentation, blood metabolites, carcass traits, and adult worm counts in meat goats is sparse. The objectives of this experiment were to determine the effects of PS supplementation on dry matter intake (DMI), average daily gain (ADG), rumen and blood plasma metabolites, carcass traits, and parasites in goats housed indoors. Scientists from USDA-ARS (Bushland, TX), Tuskegee University (Tuskegee, AL), Auburn University (Auburn, AL), and JoongBu University (S. Korea) studied how the tannin-rich ground PS mixed with grains supplementation affects animal growth performance, rumen fermentation, blood metabolites, carcass traits, and internal parasites in meat goats. This study has highlighted that supplementation of goats with CT-containing peanut skin has the potential to increase average daily gain, reduce the burden of gastrointestinal parasites. Present results indicate that the optimum level of PS supplementation ranges from 15 to 30% peanut skin (as-fed basis) or condensed tannins levels of up to 2.4 to 4.9% dry matter in the diet have potential as an anti-parasitic agent or an energy supplement in feeds.