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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Pullman, Washington » Animal Disease Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #364025

Research Project: Identification of Tick Colonization Mechanisms and Vaccine Development for Anaplasmosis

Location: Animal Disease Research

Title: First report of Anaplasma marginale infection in goats, Brazi

Author
item Dasilva, Nayara - Universidade Federal Do Parana
item Ueti, Massaro
item Johnson, W Carl - Carl
item Mira, Anabela - National Institute Of Agricultural Technology(INTA)
item Schnittger, Leonhard - National Institute Of Agricultural Technology(INTA)
item Valente, Jessica - Universidade Federal Do Parana
item Vidotto, Odilon - Universidade Federal Do Parana
item Masterson, Hayley - Washington State University
item Taus, Naomi
item Vieira, Thállitha - Universidade Federal Do Parana

Submitted to: PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 7/27/2018
Publication Date: 8/13/2018
Citation: Dasilva, N.B., Ueti, M.W., Johnson, W.C., Mira, A., Schnittger, L., Valente, J.D., Vidotto, O., Masterson, H.E., Taus, N.S., Vieira, T.S. 2018. First report of Anaplasma marginale infection in goats, Brazi. PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0202140.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0202140

Interpretive Summary: Anaplasma marginale, the causative agent of bovine anaplasmosis, is a tick-borne bacterium that causes significant economic losses for cattle industries. At least 20 ixodid tick species have been implicated in the transmission of A. marginale, including Dermacentor spp. and Rhipicephalus spp. In tropical and subtropical regions, Rhipicephalus microplus is the vector of bovine anaplasmosis. Despite host specificity of R. microplus for cattle, this tick species may be found parasitizing small ruminants. We report the first molecular detection of Anaplasma marginale in goats from northeastern Brazil, based on sequencing analysis. Amblyomma parvum and Rhipicephalus microplus were found feeding on animals.

Technical Abstract: Anaplasma marginale, the causative agent of bovine anaplasmosis, is a tick-borne bacterium that causes significant economic losses for cattle industries. A. marginale infects cattle through tick transmission worldwide, but increasingly the bacterium is being detected in other domestic and wild ruminants. At least 20 ixodid tick species have been implicated in the transmission of A. marginale, including Dermacentor spp. and Rhipicephalus spp. Anaplasma marginale is found in regions where tick vectors are endemic. In tropical and subtropical regions, Rhipicephalus microplus is the vector of bovine anaplasmosis. Despite host specificity of R. microplus for cattle, this tick species may be found parasitizing small ruminants. In Brazil, R. microplus is endemic and hampers livestock production resulting in annual economic losses estimated at U$ 3.24 billion. In northeastern Brazil, multispecies grazing is a common family subsistence practice on smallholder farms possibly facilitating interspecies transmission of pathogens. A study of cograzing ruminants has shown a single A. marginale strain infecting coexisting cattle, buffalo and ticks. A. marginale infection has been previously molecularly described in sheep from Iran. However, to the best of our knowledge, A. marginale has never been detected in goats. This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of A. marginale and factors associated with the infection in goats from the State of Paraíba, northeastern Brazil.